Author Topic: The Tech Night Owl LIVE — June 16, 2018  (Read 85 times)

Gene Steinberg

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The Tech Night Owl LIVE — June 16, 2018
« on: June 16, 2018, 09:28:16 PM »
This weekend our guests include outspoken writer/editor Bryan Chaffin, co-founder and co-publisher of The Mac Observer, The discussion includes Apple’s efforts to expand its AR efforts, and Gene’s concern that it probably won’t mean much unless you’re into gaming. And what sort of AR glasses might Apple devise to avoid the problems that afflicted the failed Google Glass? There is also a lengthy discussion of Apple’s TV prospects, where it is spending an estimated one billion dollars or more to create original content with well-known producers and directors. What format will Apple use to present these shows, which are expected to debut beginning in 2019? Will it be something to accompany Apple Music, thus Apple Music and TV? Or will Apple establish a totally separate streaming service for its new content? Gene expresses his skepticism that the world is ready for yet another streaming TV service what with so many available already, whereas Bryan feels it won’t be part of Apple TV.

In a very special encore segment, you’ll also hear from long-time Apple guru and prolific author Bob “Dr. Mac” LeVitus, as Gene recounts yet another episode of his ongoing troubles with AT&T when he tried to take advantage of a cheap offer for DirecTV. Gene explains why he’s kept AT&T service for his iPhone even though there are other and possibly better alternatives. Bob says he switched from AT&T to T-Mobile. There’s also a brief discussion of “world backup day,” as Gene facetiously suggests that maybe the show ought to go back in time to honor the event in the proper fashion. And what about published reports that future versions of macOS and iOS might allow you to run the same apps on both? And what about recent speculation that Apple will someday ditch using Intel processors on Macs and make yet another processor move, to the same A-series ARM chips used on iPhones and iPads? Is this a reasonable possibility, or would the fact that many Mac users need to run Windows at native speeds make such a move unfeasible?


Peace,
Gene Steinberg
Host-Executive Producer, The Paracast
Host-Executive Producer, The Tech Night Owl LIVE

 

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