A new study out of Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine links textured breast implants to BIA-ALCL, anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

 

Although a rare cancer. researchers believe the lifetime risk is 1 out of every 30,000 women with breast implants and if the numbers are underreported, could be as common as 1 out of every 4000 women with implants.

 

Although the implants are used to augment breast tissue, the malignancy is not a breast cancer but rather a lymphoma.

 

Lymphomas make up the most common of the blood cancers.  The cancer begins in the lymphocytes, cells crucial for maintaining one’s immune system. Two main types of lymphoma are Hodgkin’s and Non Hodgkin's.  Non Hodgkins is more common, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a subset if it.

 

 

anaplastic-large-cell-lymphoma-[3-ln072-3].jpg

ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMA/PATHPEDIA.COM

In this study, researchers reviewed 115 scientific articles from 1997 – January 2017.  Unlike the report released earlier this year by the FDA, the researchers did not find a link between BIA-ALCL and smooth breast implants.  Of the articles reviewed, 93 cases were cited and the cancer appeared 10 years after the textured implants were placed.

 

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, there are currently 160 cases in the US and a total of 391 worldwide as of September 2017.

 

Last March the FDA reported 9 women had died from anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) possibly associated with their breast implant use.  The FDA received 359 reports of BIA-ALCL,  a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 9 of whom died as of February 1, 2017.

This is not the first time a link has been suggested.  6 years ago the World Health Organization suggested a link.  Then in 2011, the FDA identified a possible association between the two.  In 2016, the  Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration reported 46 confirmed cases with 3 deaths relating to breast implants.

 

The report last spring suggested that BIA-ALCL affected both smooth and textured implants. According to the FDA report, 231 of the 359 cancer cases provided information on implant type.   203 were reported to be textured implants and 28 reported to be smooth implants. When it came to silicone vs. saline implants, the FDA said 312 of the 359 reports provided these specifics and of those 186 reported implants filled with silicone gel and 126 reported implants filled with saline.

 

TEXTURED.jpg

 

So neither implant type appeared immune to the risk of BIA-ALCL but it appears the silicone, textured implants carried the most risk.

 

Now the cancer occurred within the breast and the FDA advises physicians to consider the possibility of BIA-ALCL if there appears to be a seroma (fluid filled cavity around the implant) or a contracture (pulling of the skin and tissue) near the implant.

 

In most cases the cancer is treatable, with removal of the implant and the surrounding tissue curative.  In some cases however, radiation of the area or chemotherapy is required.

 

Although 50,000 cases of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma occurs annually in the US, it is unknown how many cases of BIA-ALCL occur each year.  Moreover, many countries may not have avid reporting systems of breast implant related cancers as we do.  According to the American College of Plastic Surgeons, close to 300,000 women receive breast implants each year, some of which for breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer.

 

The FDA reminds us that BIA-ALCL is rare and prophylactic breast implant removal is NOT recommended. However we need to be aware and evaluate if one develops swelling, pain, new lumps or asymmetry in the breasts….just as we do for those without implants.

For more on the study, visit here.

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

Published in News & Information

On Sunday, Green Bay Packers Quarterback Aaron Rodgers suffered a collarbone fracture and may be out for the season.  Here are your questions answered.

What exactly is a collarbone?

 

The collarbone is another name for the clavicle.  It’s the bone that connects the scapula (shoulder-blade) to the sternum (breastbone).  We have one on each side and it runs horizontally providing shoulder girdle support.  Not only does it provide upper skeletal strength and support but it also protects many major vessels that run underneath it.

 

 

clavicle

Image from AAOS

What’s a collarbone fracture?

 

The clavicle (collarbone) is one of the most common types of bones to fracture during sports injuries.  There are three major Groups or Types of clavicle fractures.

 

Type I – is the most common and occurs in the middle third of the clavicle

 

Type II – is the second most common and occurs distally, or closer to the shoulder.

 

Type III – is the most rare and occurs the most medially, or closer to the rib cage/sternum.

clavicle fractures

 

What are the signs/symptoms of a clavicle fracture?

 

Before bruising and swelling ensue, one will have sharp pain in the area of the collarbone and have difficulty moving his shoulder.

 

So signs of a clavicle fracture include:

 

  • Pain

  • Loss of range of motion of the shoulder

  • A bulge at the fracture site

  • Swelling

  • Bruising

  • Tenderness at the fracture area

  • In young children, not wanting to move the arm on the affected side

 

How are collarbone fractures treated?

 

If the bone has not shifted too significantly, clavicle fractures can be treated non- surgically. Arm slings will be given to decrease the movement of the shoulder girdle.  Pain medication and antiinflammatories may be prescribed, and physical therapy will be instituted immediately to improve range of motion and strength.

 

If the clavicle is displaced significantly from the injury then surgery will be needed to reunite the ends using plates, rods and screws.

 

How long does it take collarbone fractures to heal?

 

In adults, healing could take anywhere from 6-12 weeks.  For children, clavicle fractures may heal sooner.

How does one prevent a collarbone fracture?

 

During sports, protective equipment is key to avoiding injuries from falls and tackles.  As in Aaron Rodger’s and Tony Romo’s cases, being sacked by another large player barreling towards them must be avoided at all costs.

 

Just say NO to sugar.  This will be a hard one for me but if you do it, I will.

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

Published in News & Information

The World Health Organization (WHO) finds the number of obese children in the world to be 10 times greater than what it was 4 decades ago.

 

They estimate currently 50 million girls and 74 million boys are obese worldwide.

 

Back in 1975 only 11 million children worldwide were obese. Now the number sits at 124 million.

True, population has grown since then, but the percentage of children obese is exploding -- 19% of girls and 22.4% of boys in the US are considered obese.

 

Adult obesity is skyrocketing as well. In 1975 there were 100 million obese adults worldwide. This jumped to 671 million in 2016 and doesn’t include the 1.3 billion “overweight” adults.

 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states the following:

 

Obesity is defined as having excess body fat. Overweight is defined as having excess body weight for a particular height from fat, muscle, bone, water, or a combination of these factors. Body mass index, or BMI, is a widely used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity. BMI percentile is preferred for measuring children and young adults (ages 2–20) because it takes into account that they are still growing, and growing at different rates depending on their age and sex. Health professionals use growth charts to see whether a child’s weight falls into a healthy range for the child’s height, age, and sex.

  • Children with a BMI at or above the 85th percentile and less than the 95th percentile are considered overweight.

  • Children at or above the 95th percentile have obesity.

 

Why such a rise in obesity?

 

  1. We’re successfully fighting the war on tobacco. Adults especially can’t turn to a stick of nicotine as easily as they once could to curb their appetite.  Teen smoking is down as well, so their appetites may be up.

  2. We like fast food.  Its cheap, yummy and convenient.  For 99 cents you can get a small burger that is served to you in a matter of minutes and can be eaten before your next meeting or class.  Fast food contains excess calories, fat and preservatives that our body doesn’t need.

  3. We eat too quickly.  The speed at which we eat may affect our metabolism.  Eating too quickly prevents a satiety signal from reaching the brain, hence we will gulp down more food than is needed.  For more on this read here.

  4. We don’t move around as much.  We can all agree that children and adults these days don’t play outside as much as we did in previous generations.  And even if we did get some exercise in each day during PE or at the gym, we lose much of the ground gained when we sit on our computers at night for hours on end.

  5. More hormones are in our food.  Hormones such as steroids and recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) that enhance food production in our food-producing animals may affect our metabolism.

  6. Sugar isn’t a treat anymore, it’s considered a food group.  In the 70’s if you got dessert one night at dinner it would be a rare treat.  Today kids have dessert at lunch and even breakfast has sugar levels over flowing the cereal bowl.  Excess sugar leads to fat storage.

  7. Our portions have gotten bigger.  Remember when the Quarter Pounder came out in the early 70’s and we thought it was the biggest burger ever?  Now people will eat two in one sitting.

 

Below is a table showing the difference in portion sizes today vs. the 1950’s.

 

portion sizes.jpg
Image from Daily Mail

 

What can we do to combat the obesity epidemic?

 

  1. Make exercise not a choice but a daily necessity. Schools should have English class conducted on walks around the school rather than sitting in desks. A 30 minute workout should be a given every morning without excuses. We brush our teeth, we wash our hair, we gas up our truck, we exercise.

  2. Eat fresh, avoid fast food.  The more junk food the more junk in your trunk.  Avoid preservatives and processed foods. Your body was designed to eat the basics. Give it what it needs.

  3. Eat slowly.  No need to chow down on the run. If you’re in a hurry then eat half the sandwich as save the rest for later. Which brings us to…

  4. Eat smaller portions. Get rid of the platters you call plates these days and eat your dinner off of a saucer dish. You’ll still fill up your tummy.

  5. Swap vegetables for carbs. It’s healthier, filling, and helps you poop.

Just say NO to sugar.  This will be a hard one for me but if you do it, I will.

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Published in News & Information

Investigators believe the Las Vegas Route 91 Harvest Concert shooter, Stephen Paddock, suffered from severe mental illness that was never diagnosed. This seems obvious to us, as anyone who would kill 59 innocent people and wound hundreds more could never be of sound mind.

 

However, one would think a person this mentally unstable would leave a pattern of behavior footprints that would have been picked up earlier in his life.

 

Although no motive has been established in the shooting, investigators have interviewed multiple acquaintances who knew the 64-year-old real estate investor and were told he was disconnected, stand-offish, and lacked multiple social interactions. However, he easily flew under the radar as he had a girlfriend, appeared to be close to his mother, and had successful real estate dealings that funded his gambling habits.

 

Most mass shootings are committed not by those who spent time in mental institutions but by those who dined, shopped, and lived near their victims. And many have been under the care of medical providers, being prescribed medications that address psychological symptoms.  So how do mass shooters evade proper diagnosis?

They don’t fit the stereotype

 

To the layman, the average person with severe mental illness appears highly erratic, confused, unpredictable.  To a trained medical professional, the same symptoms would trigger their suspicions as well.

 

But the average killer may be a psychopath, being impulsive, antisocial, and exhibiting violent behavior.  If they don’t act violent or violently impulsive, they can elude the interviewer.

They may hide from the public

 

A mass shooter will plan their attack, may stake out locations, and but will overall remain isolated to avoid arousing suspicions. And a psychopath, may exhibit antisocial behavior.  So as they stay remain isolated and introverted, they allow less opportunity to be “made.”

They fly under the radar

 

As in Stephen Paddock’s case, he flew under the radar as he did not avoid the public.  He would drink, gamble, frequent casinos and appear to be very successful in his business/real estate dealings. With lack of a criminal record and violent interactions, the average person wouldn’t deem him suspicious of committing such a heinous act.

They don’t want to be treated medically

 

Many people with mental illness may have symptoms they wish to control, but will stop short of admitting they have a medical condition that needs treatment.  Those who suffer from delusions or psychosis may believe others are exhibiting the abnormal behavior, so why would they want to undergo treatment themselves?

 

Moreover, if they fear being “turned in” by the medical provider interviewing them and revealing homicidal ideation, they will be less inclined to seek medical help.

They may not have health insurance

 

If an individual with severe mental illness has difficulty maintaining a job, he/she most likely will be without employer-paid health insurance.  This limits access to seeking medical help all the more.

 

The chilling truth is we have killers who live among us who may plot and plan right under our noses.  Let’s pray they leave enough clues that they get caught before they carry out their plans.

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

Published in News & Information
Thursday, 05 October 2017 19:16

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Celebrities such as Julia Louise-Dreyfus, Olivia Newton-John, Christina Applegate and Rita Wilson have revealed their breast cancer diagnoses, helping raise awareness for the most common cancer to affect women.  It’s the second most common cause of cancer death in females.

How common is breast cancer?

 

1 in 8 women will develop invasive breast cancer of the course of their lifetime. According to BreastCancer.org, an estimated 252,710 cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the US with 63,410 cases of non-invasive breast cancer.

40,610 of these women are expected to die this year of breast cancer.

How is breast cancer staged?

 

Breast cancer is staged based on size of the tumor, if lymph nodes are affected and whether the cancer has spread to distant areas of the body.  Prognosis varies greatly on the stage.

Screen-Shot-2012-09-27-at-9.59.51-AM.png

IMAGE ABOVE FROM JOHNSTON HEALTH

 

Is family history a huge factor?

 

85% of breast cancer cases occur in women with NO family history.

Screening of breast cancer

 

Mammograms are the first line screening tool for breast cancer and are currently recommended biennial for women aged 50-74.  However for those at higher risk, mammogram screening should start earlier, with possible follow-up ultrasound, and be performed more regularly.

FullSizeRender (1)

3-D MAMMOGRAM IMAGE

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?

 

Risk factors for breast cancer include:

  • Age greater than 50

  • Family History

  • BRAC1 and BRAC2 genetic mutations

  • Alcohol use

  • Never been pregnant or becoming pregnant for the first time over 35 years old

  • Early menarche at age 11 or younger

  • Obesity, especially after menopause

  • Dense breasts

  • Lack of physical activity

  • Use of oral contraceptives

  • Previous “precancerous” tumors such as atypical hyperplasia

  • DES exposure

  • Previous radiation therapy

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Published in News & Information
Tuesday, 03 October 2017 17:03

Las Vegas Shooting: How YOU Can Help

Sunday night’s shooting of concert goers at the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival has left 58 dead and wounded hundreds others in the deadliest mass shooting to affect the United States.  Here’s how you can help:

Las Vegas Victim’s Fund

Established by Steve Sisolak, Clark County Commission Chair, this fund is helping to raise funds for victims and their families.  Go Fund Me Page is here.

Blood Donation

Thousands of units of blood are needed and can come from local and out of state donors.

United Blood Services have locations throughout the country that can accept your blood Donation. Contact UBS here.

The American Red Cross is accepting donations. On their website, they ask to visit redcross.org.

Moreover Red Cross is taking donations. Call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

Petition

We are asking President Trump to help declare a National Blood Donation Week.  Please sign and SHARE the petition below:

Petition

Secret Garden Radio For Las Vegas Fund

R&B icon Al B. Sure, Host of Secret Garden @SlowJams Morning show via iHeart Radio & Host of Secret Garden Radio @ our historic KCEP Power 88.1 FM is raising money for victims and their families here.

National Compassion Fund

Funds will help the immediate and long term needs of victims and their families.  Donate here.

 

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Published in News & Information

The Seinfeld and Veep iconic comedian is battling breast cancer.

 

On social media, Julia Louise-Dreyfus revealed that she was diagnosed with breast cancer the day after she won her 6th consecutive Emmy.

 

“1 in 8 women get breast cancer. Today, I’m the one,” Louis-Dreyfus, 56, wrote. “The good news is that I have the most glorious group of supportive and caring family and friends. The bad news is that not all women are so lucky, so let’s fight all cancers and make universal health care a reality.”

At this time no further details have been revealed of her cancer staging, which would come after further testing.

How is breast cancer staged?

Breast cancer is staged based on size of the tumor, if lymph nodes are affected and whether the cancer has spread to distant areas of the body.  Prognosis varies greatly on the stage.



Screen-Shot-2012-09-27-at-9.59.51-AM.png

Image above from Johnston Health

How common is breast cancer?

1 in 8 women will develop invasive breast cancer of the course of their lifetime. According to BreastCancer.org, an estimated 252,710 cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the US with 63,410 cases of non-invasive breast cancer.

 

40,610 of these women are expected to die this year of breast cancer.

Is family history a huge factor?

 

85% of breast cancer cases occur in women with NO family history.

Screening of breast cancer

Mammograms are the first line screening tool for breast cancer and are currently recommended biennial for women aged 50-74.  However for those at higher risk, mammogram screening should start earlier, with possible follow-up ultrasound, and be performed more regularly.

 

FullSizeRender (1)

3-D Mammogram image

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?

 

Risk factors for breast cancer include:

  • Age greater than 50

  • Family History

  • BRAC1 and BRAC2 genetic mutations

  • Alcohol use

  • Never been pregnant or becoming pregnant for the first time over 35 years old

  • Early menarche at age 11 or younger

  • Obesity, especially after menopause

  • Dense breasts

  • Lack of physical activity

  • Use of oral contraceptives

  • Previous “precancerous” tumors such as atypical hyperplasia

  • DES exposure

  • Previous radiation therapy

 

This is a developing story.

 

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 Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Published in News & Information

As Baby Boomers age out of blood donation, younger generations need to help fill the void.

 

Although the process of blood donation and transfusion was discovered in the 1600’s, widespread civilian blood donation became popular during World War II. According to the American Red Cross, 13 million pints were collected for the war effort. And children of this era learned of how significant blood product was for our troops and war effort. Baby Boomers incorporated routine blood donation as part of their culture.



 

blood donation.jpg

 

 

Yet as Baby Boomers age are the younger generations picking up the slack?

 

According to James AuBuchon, president and chief executive of Bloodworks Northwest, “The older generations seemed to have internalized the message that we always have to have an adequate supply of blood on the shelves.”  He continues, “The younger generations just seem less wired toward that message.”

 

Blood banks have, however, made some progress recruiting younger individuals as many are beginning to donate blood on high school and college campuses.

 

According to USA Today:

 

  • 20% of blood donations come from the youngest of age groups 16-18 and 19-22.

  • Less than 10% of blood donations come from 23-29 year olds.

  • Less than 12% of blood donations come from those in their 30’s.

  • This year, the active hurricane season has hampered blood collection efforts.

The White House Can Help

A petition has been started asking the White House to proclaim a National Blood Donation Week to help raise blood supply and awareness. People can easily add their name to the petition here:

 

Petition for National Blood Donation Week

How can I Donate Blood?

 

As long as you are over 17 years old (16 with the consent of parent) and weigh above 110 lbs, you may qualify for blood donation. The blood bank will screen you prior to donation.

 

Local drives can be found going to  American Red Cross Blood Drive Locator.  or United Blood Services/BloodHero.com.

 

One pint of blood can help save up to three lives.  Thank you so much for your support!!

 

LearnHealthSpanish.com / Medical Spanish made easy.

 

 

Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Published in News & Information

Ex-Patriot’s tight end, and convicted murder, Aaron Hernandez, was found post mortem to have had severe CTE.

 

Athletes who sustain multiple concussions are at high risk of developing CTE, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This progressive, degenerative disease of the brain is also found in veterans and those who sustained repeated head trauma. Symptoms include mood disorders, paranoia, impulse control issues, aggression, and memory loss to name a few.

 

A lawsuit (reportedly $20 million) has been filed by the family against the NFL and New England Patriots. Hernandez was only 27 years old when he hung himself in his prison cell April 19th of this year.

Researchers from Boston University concluded the 27 year-old football star had stage 3 of 4 CTE. This severity is rarely seen in someone this young.

 

The lawsuit claims that by the time Hernandez joined the NFL, the league knew of the dangers of concussions and led players to believe they were safe. Attorney Jose Baez stated the Patriots and NFL were “fully aware of the damage that could be inflicted from repetitive impact injuries and failed to disclose, treat or protect him from the dangers of such damage.”

 

Neuropathologists found loss of brain volume (atrophy), and tau protein deposits throughout his frontal lobes. The frontal lobe of the brain regulates impulse control, memory, judgement, social behavior and problem solving.

 

What are the stages of CTE?

 

The CTE Stages are as follows:

 

Stage 1: Loss of concentration, attention, dizziness and headaches

 

Stage 2: Additionally short term memory loss,  mood disorder such as depression, and at times explosive outbursts

 

Stage 3: Worsening loss of memory, judgement, ability to do daily tasks, movement disorders, tremors and suicidality

 

Stage 4: Amnesia, severe cognitive impairment, evidence of dementia.



CTE.jpg

Image from Sites at Penn State

 

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LearnHealthSpanish.com / Medical Spanish made easy.

 

 

Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

Published in News & Information
Thursday, 21 September 2017 17:08

One-third of Americans Have “Bad Teeth”

A study out of the University of Michigan finds 1 in 3 middle-aged Americans suffer poor dental health.

The Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation at the University of Michigan, with support from AARP and Michigan Medicine, conducted the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging poll and found the following:

 

  • 33% of Americans aged 50-64 are embarrassed by the condition of their teeth

  • Close to 40% suffer pain, difficulty eating and missing work due to their teeth

  • 40% do not get regular cleanings or preventative care for their dental health

  • 28% lack dental insurance

  • 51% are concerned they won’t have dental coverage once they turn 65

  • Many of the study participants only went to the dentist once the dental issue was serious

  • 13% are hoping that Medicare or Medicaid will provide their dental coverage, but traditional Medicare doesn’t cover routine dental care and Medicaid dental benefits are rare.

 

The majority of the respondents understand the importance of routine preventative dental care and would seek evaluation earlier if they could.

 

Study author Dr. Preeti Malani, stated, “Even those who were diligent about seeing the dentist and had dental insurance throughout adulthood may find it harder to afford dental care as they get older and coverage options may be more limited.”

 

Other issues that affect one seeking dental care include fear of having a dental procedure and lack of local dental specialists in their city or town.

 

Emphasis needs to be put on ensuring dental care is apart of Medicare or any new healthcare system, and should include children and adults of all ages.

 

Tooth decay and gum disease can be linked to a variety of health issues including cardiovascular risk.

The American Dental Association recommends the following:

 

  • Brushing your teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice a day.

  • Flossing once a day

  • Drinking plenty of water and keeping a healthy diet

  • Replace your toothbrush every 3 months or sooner if frayed or damaged

  • Dental check ups once or twice a year, or more often if needed.

 

 

young-woman-brushing-teeth

 

 

 

The moral, don’t wait till the last minute.  Regular checkups prevent worsening issues, and a dental issue caught early is easier, and less expensive, to treat.

 

For more on this study, see here.

 

--

 

LearnHealthSpanish.com / Medical Spanish made easy.

 

 

Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news.  Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

 

Published in News & Information
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