Items filtered by date: Wednesday, 21 November 2018

This week, the CDC issued a general warning that Romaine lettuce is not safe to eat.

32 people from 11 states have become ill due to this recent outbreak of E. coli.

The Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 sickened 32 people between the dates October 8-31, 2018 and caused 13 hospitalizations, one of whom went into kidney failure.

No deaths have been reported.

On Tuesday they issued the following tweet:

CDC‏ @CDCgov

Outbreak Alert: Do not eat any romaine lettuce, including whole heads and hearts, chopped, organic and salad mixes with romaine until we learn more. If you don’t know if it’s romaine or can’t confirm the source, don’t eat it. https://go.usa.gov/xPAy5

 

On their website, the CDC reports the following:

 

CDC is advising that U.S. consumers not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers and restaurants not serve or sell any, until we learn more about the outbreak. This investigation is ongoing and the advice will be updated as more information is available.

  • CONSUMERS WHO HAVE ANY TYPE OF ROMAINE LETTUCE IN THEIR HOME SHOULD NOT EAT IT AND SHOULD THROW IT AWAY, EVEN IF SOME OF IT WAS EATEN AND NO ONE HAS GOTTEN SICK.
    • THIS ADVICE INCLUDES ALL TYPES OR USES OF ROMAINE LETTUCE, SUCH AS WHOLE HEADS OF ROMAINE, HEARTS OF ROMAINE, AND BAGS AND BOXES OF PRECUT LETTUCE AND SALAD MIXES THAT CONTAIN ROMAINE, INCLUDING BABY ROMAINE, SPRING MIX, AND CAESAR SALAD.
    • IF YOU DO NOT KNOW IF THE LETTUCE IS ROMAINE OR WHETHER A SALAD MIX CONTAINS ROMAINE, DO NOT EAT IT AND THROW IT AWAY.
    • WASH AND SANITIZE DRAWERS OR SHELVES IN REFRIGERATORS WHERE ROMAINE WAS STORED. FOLLOW THESE FIVE STEPS TO CLEAN YOUR REFRIGERATOR.
  • RESTAURANTS AND RETAILERS SHOULD NOT SERVE OR SELL ANY ROMAINE LETTUCE, INCLUDING SALADS AND SALAD MIXES CONTAINING ROMAINE.
  • TAKE ACTION IF YOU HAVE SYMPTOMS OF AN E. COLI INFECTION:
    • TALK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER.
    • WRITE DOWN WHAT YOU ATE IN THE WEEK BEFORE YOU STARTED TO GET SICK.
    • REPORT YOUR ILLNESS TO THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT.
    • ASSIST PUBLIC HEALTH INVESTIGATORS BY ANSWERING QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR ILLNESS.
ADVICE TO CLINICIANS
  • ANTIBIOTICS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED FOR PATIENTS WITH E. COLI O157 INFECTIONS. ANTIBIOTICS ARE ALSO NOT RECOMMENDED FOR PATIENTS IN WHOM E.COLI O157 INFECTION IS SUSPECTED, UNTIL DIAGNOSTIC TESTING RULES OUT THIS INFECTION.
  • SOME STUDIES HAVE SHOWN THAT ADMINISTERING ANTIBIOTICS TO PATIENTS WITH E. COLI O157 INFECTIONS MIGHT INCREASE THEIR RISK OF DEVELOPING HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME (A TYPE OF KIDNEY FAILURE), AND THE BENEFIT OF ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT HAS NOT BEEN CLEARLY DEMONSTRATED.

Symptoms of E. coli poisoning can occur anywhere from 1-10 days after ingestion.

They include:

  • Nausea
    Vomiting
    Diarrhea, may be bloody
    Fever
    Chills
    Body Aches
    Abdominal Cramps

And if progresses, can cause

  • Shortness of Breath
    Nose bleeds
    Anemia
    Dehydration
    Seizures
    Renal Failure
    Death

Exposure to E. coli may occur from exposure to contaminated foods (from human or animal waste) or undercooked meats.

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

 

Published in Health

Well, winter & those pesky cold months are upon us and, just like clockwork, old Mother Nature has decided its time for a nap. Now, if you live in a Northern state, like I do, or you're just concerned about cold weather, you may find yourself asking - is my car ready? Well, here is a short list of things you can (mostly) check yourself to see if you're good to go for a short drive or out for that long road trip to Thanksgiving dinner.

Just check these five things:

First: Check your oil level. Make sure you check the level with the engine both cold and warm. Look online or refer to your owner’s manual for additional assistance.

Second: Make sure your coolant (antifreeze) is the correct mixture, that the level is full and that the overflow area is filled to the line. You never want to open the filler cap when the engine is hot so make sure you check it when the engine is cold. Personally, I prefer to check with the engine running but you don't have to if you don't want to. If you do not have the correct tool to gauge the freezing or boiling point of your antifreeze, you can buy a tester for approx. $15 at any Walmart or an auto parts store. For convenience, most oil change shops or even a Tires Plus, offer this service.

Third: Make sure all four tires are filled with air to the correct point. Check to see that they all have good tread depth, that no cords (wires) are showing and that there are no bald spots. No one wants to blow a tire in the cold, worst of all change a tire on the side of the road in the cold. Good tread depth will help you keep control on cold surfaces in the rain, snow & slush.

Fourth: Make sure your battery is in good condition. This might mean the difference between a safe quick trip to your destination and standing alongside the road out in the cold, holding a pair of jumper cables.

Places like Batteries Plus can check your battery condition, free of charge.

Finally: Check your transmission fluid. Fill it up and make sure that the old fluid does not smell like a burnt pile of garbage. If it does, take it in for a flush and change. Remember that not all cars have a dipstick to check the transmission fluid so you may have to go to Jiffy Lube or Tires Plus. Keep in mind, some of these places charge for this service, so make sure to ask for a winter package or a group rate and you might get a discount.

And that's it! Five quick tips as the title promised. But, that means its time for me to sign off and get back to my day job.

Safe travels, and keep it on all four tires!

 

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Lee Wickenhauser is a guest contributor to GCN news. His views and opinions, if expressed, are his own. Lee is a full time ad man / part time motorist-mechanic-maniac!

 

Published in News & Information