Items filtered by date: Tuesday, 27 June 2017
Tuesday, 27 June 2017 20:37

In Memory: Joyce Riley (1948 – 2017)

We regret to announce the passing of Captain Joyce Riley. Joyce was host of The Power Hour, one of our longest running shows. I did not know her personally and so thought it best to let her colleagues over at The Power Hour tell you about her life.

From www.powerhournation.com:

In Memory of Joyce Riley 1948-2017

The very definition of a Baby Boomer…the Riley family welcomed a bouncing baby girl three summers after the Japanese surrendered to end World War II. Born on 7/31/1948 Joyce came to the World in the usual way – to a typical American family outside of Arkansas City, Kansas on the border with Oklahoma.  Fittingly, she was born in the heart of the United States…because eventually she would capture the hearts of millions of People around the world.

Her Father owned a pharmacy while her mother was a stay-at-home mom. She was the oldest of three children. If you knew Joyce you would probably know the one thing she liked more than being on the Power Hour was quilting. That love came honestly as she inherited from her Master Quiltsman Mother. Undoubtedly her father’s involvement in the medical community influenced her career decisions. The tragedy of her family came when one of her younger brothers died unexpectedly. It was a sore that in some ways tore at the emotional fabric of her family her entire life.

As a young woman she was determined to make some mark in the world.  The tenacity we grew to love brought her all the way to the University of Kansas. “Rock, chalk, Jayhawk,” rolled off her tongue like it belonged. Her passion to help those who couldn’t always help themselves was embedded in her makeup. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and went far…in a wide range of nursing duties in the private sector.

Her expertise and willingness to serve landed her in the Air Force. Joyce became a Flight Nurse aboard C-130 missions in support of Operation Desert Storm. The kinship she felt with those in uniform is a lasting legacy. The experimentation she endured and witnessed changed her forever.  A champion of the forgotten men and women of the Desert Storm era may be the badge of honor she cherished the most.

Before she would bring the plight of the Iraq War era soldier to the masses she took several important stands. And stands…and stands in the face of brutal scrutiny. While employed at Bexar County Hospital in San Antonio Joyce became involved in Nursing medical Malpractice issues after learning Nurse Genene Jones was responsible for the deaths of many children in the well-publicized “Baby Death” case. Until her health would no longer permit she was an expert witness for both plaintiff and defense medical cases. She has presented at the National Institutes of Health, and many legal conferences including the American trial Lawyers Association.

Her expertise and crucial voice lead her to the radio and well over 1500 radio guest appearances.  From 1996-1999 with her husband Dave von Kleist, she travelled the country as an advocate for the American Gulf War Veterans Association. With Agent Orange reports, Miracle II Soap, and crucial info for veterans throughout the nation GulfWarVets.com exploded in its effort to assist Vets in need. In the Spring of 2000 The Power Hour Radio Show landed on the GCN Network.  With her exuberant husband by her side Joyce laid the path for the modern independent media movement. The Power Hour became synonymous with blowing the lid off of our less than honest reality. “It’s all about the Truth!”, “Doing the next, right and honorable thing,” “Knowledge is power!”, “Caring about your world,” were all well-deserved and well-used catch phrases.

With the tenacity of a bulldog, an unusual wit and a special Midwestern charm Joyce endeared herself to a massive audience. The advent and success of the truth media can be traced directly to The Power Hour and the Nation of People who called it home.  Her pursuit of natural treatments for her Cancer diagnosis will long be admired and used in coming generations. She is survived by an adoring body of listeners and advocates who have found the world a better place by having Joyce in it. So many owe so much to this giant in the communication world.  Ever private with so much personal information it is proper now to note she has one brother and one son from an early marriage remaining.

The shadow is long and the path is well worn following the Voice of our Joyce. Whether quilting or twirling a baton or questioning the highest government bodies on the planet, Joyce Riley will forever be in our universe. The Power Hour Nation sleeps with heavy hearts this night as her mortal struggle is over and a new world has begun for her. It is easy to imagine her tracking down some unsuspecting former character who was responsible for so much suffering in this world and giving them a piece of her mind…that is in between twirling her baton again. Because if there is one thing we know…no army can stop an idea whose time has come and no one will ever forget Capt’n Joyce Riley.

 

 

Published in News & Information

So you’ve got an idea that’s going to revolutionize an industry. You’ve got some startup capital to invest in your business, and you’re ready to dedicate yourself to your startup. But before you launch your product or service, there are mistakes you can easily avoid when starting your business that will sink your startup before it starts up.

1. Write a business plan before doing anything else

You might be thinking, “But I don’t need any funding,” or “I’m bootstrapping this business,” or “I have to be first to market.” And none of that matters. A business plan isn’t just a way to entice investors to provide funding for your startup. It’s a way for you to get to get to know your business intimately.

Most startups that fail do so because the CEO provided a product or service that didn’t solve a problem. Don’t try to solve a problem people don’t know they have; solve a problem they know they have. Writing a business plan is the best way to determine whether your business is solving a problem people know they have.

A business plan will also help prepare content for your website. You’ll nail down your company’s mission and answer key questions customers will have about your business. You’ll likely realize where a section of your business plan fits on your website while you’re writing it.

Most importantly, a business plan will help you prepare for each phase of your startup process, both operationally and financially. You’ll know how much startup capital you’ll need to start your business and have a budget so you don’t overextend yourself. You’ll also know who you’ll need to help start your business, and the list is probably longer than you imagined.

2. Invest in people before your product or service

The most important assets a company has is its employees, and it’s no different for a startup. Before you invest in a prototype or technology, surrounding yourself with the right people can help you avoid a failed launch of your business.

The first people you need are potential customers. You’re not selling them at this point, but their needs should dictate yours and that of your company. They can provide valuable feedback about your product or service that will help you perfect it prior to launch. Talk to at least 15 people you think would have an interest in your product or service. Let them know what you intend to offer and how they would improve it.

One of the best investments you can make in your business is in public relations. You might think you can do this work yourself, especially after writing a business plan. After all, you know your business better than anyone else. But journalists and editors of newspapers, magazines and websites are more apt to publish something about your business when it comes from a PR person or firm with whom they’re familiar. A press release received from an email address that contains the same business name as the press release doesn’t exactly scream “trust me.” A third party writing about your business, though, does have some validity, even though you’re paying that party.

You’ll likely pay more than you think, too, according to Tom Hogan and Carol Broadbent’s new book, The Ultimate Start-up Guide: Marketing Lessons, War Stories, and Hard-won Advice from Leading Venture Capitalists and Angel Investors. Hogan and Broadbent recommend you never have a PR firm work on your account part-time and to hire a local firm where available. You should also seek out a PR firm that has contacts with media members who publish to your target market. And when you set the initial meeting, request that the people who will be actually working on your account are at the meeting. Some firms will send principal members of the firm who will never actually work on your account. Don’t allow them to pull the “bait-and-switch.”

Once you’ve chosen a PR firm to spread the word about your company, set regular updates and weekly meetings to keep everyone on the same page and make sure your goals are being accomplished. Also be sure that your public relations team is fulfilling your agreed-upon reporting style.

Another place new business owners attempt to save money is by not hiring a social media manager. Don’t do this unless you are a social media wizard that understands how to read Facebook Insights and analytics and where to best invest your social media advertising dollars. If your target market is Millenials, the majority, if not all of your advertising budget should be spent online.

3. Don’t do business with family

If you have a family member with money to invest in your startup, don’t allow them to do so unless they’re aware they could lose every penny and you know it won’t alter your relationship.

If your big brother is a social media wizard, think twice about hiring him as a social media manager. How will your big brother handle taking orders from you? Believe me, I know what it’s like to work with family. I made my senior film a family affair and ended up being ordered around by my elders despite being the writer, producer, assistant director and assistant editor of the film. While I didn’t follow their orders, it wasn’t pleasant for anyone else on set.

4. Don’t go it alone

You need a partner. While no one likes to give up equity in their company, investors like to see at least two people working together to start a business. It shows that both are capable of working with others. If you go it alone you don’t give that impression.

Having a partner also allows you to get a different perspective to make more well-informed decisions early in the startup process. Working within your own bubble puts your business in a bubble that will burst. Be open to new ideas and different perspectives because your business can benefit.

5. Find a mentor

You can find business executives that will give you free advice through SCORE, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping small business get their start. Just enter your zip code and find business mentors near you. They’ll give you tips on your business plan, sales, advertising, operations management, etc.

There are also other tools available through SCORE. There are templates for business forms, webinars that will answer your immediate questions, and you can even register for a workshop in your area our schedule time with a business counselor. Even if you’re confident in your business plan, run it by a mentor to see what you and your partner are missing.

6. Stick to a timeline for launch and expansion

Whether you’re planning a soft launch or a massive grand opening, your launch is the first impression potential customers get of your business. Don’t screw it up too badly because it can sink your startup before is starts. Plan every part of your launch (and expansion) meticulously and stick to that timeline. Set goals that you want to reach within a certain period of time and then meet those short-term goals. If you say you’re going to launch on a certain date in press releases and advertisements, the worst thing you could do is push back your launch date because you’re behind schedule.

You’ll also want to set goals for expanding your company and meet those goals within a certain timeframe. If you say you want to open a new store within three years of launch, make sure you do your damndest to be in a position to do so. Meeting your goals gives you a lot to brag about as a company and CEO.

These are the easiest and most common mistakes you can avoid when starting your business, so don’t let one of them sink your startup before it starts.

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If you like this, you might like these Genesis Communications Network talk shows: USA Prepares, Building America, Free Talk Live, American Survival Radio, Jim Brown’s Common Sense, Drop Your Energy Bill, The Tech Night Owl

Published in News & Information

Carrie Fisher died December 27th, four days after suffering cardiac arrest on board a flight from London to LAX and this week the autopsy report reveals cocaine, heroin, methadone and ecstasy could have contributed.

At the time of death, the 60 year old, was having multiple apneic episodes, in which she stopped breathing in her sleep. A variety of factors can contribute to this but the coroner in his report stated, “Based on the available toxicological information, we cannot establish the significance of the multiple substances that were detected in Ms. Fisher’s blood and tissue, with regard to the cause of death.

The report also stated she took Lamictal and Abilify used for Bipolar disorder and mood stabilization, as well as Prozac, used for depression and anxiety.  She appeared to also take oxycodone, not prescribed to her.

It has not been confirmed that narcotics led to her respiratory depression that could have induced sleep apnea and later cardiac arrest.

Unfortunately it's common for those who suffer from Bipolar Disorder to also suffer from drug addiction. Bipolar disorder, or commonly known as manic depression, is where one has unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity and can go from highs to lows in their mood within a short period of time.

Drugs may induce this type of psychiatric illness and conversely bipolar disorder may induce drug use.

The beloved actress battled drug addiction and in a 2013 statement to the Herald-Tribune said, “Then, by the time I was 21 it was LSD. I didn’t love cocaine, but I wanted to feel any way other than the way I did, so I’d do anything.”

In 1985 she was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and had been an advocate for earlier diagnosis of mental health issues.

Her cardiac status was unknown until recently when she had her “episode” on the London to LA flight.  Carrie Fisher became a global sensation in the 1970’s in Star Wars‘ Princess Leia.

Here autopsy report can be found here:  351717158-Carrie-Fisher-Autopsy-Report

 

LearnHealthSpanish.com / Medical Spanish made easy.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a Board Certified Family Physician. The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

Published in News & Information