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Health (81)

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Celebrities such as Julia Louise-Dreyfus, Olivia Newton-John, Christina Applegate and Cynthia Nixon have revealed their breast cancer diagnoses, helping raise awareness for the most common cancer to affect women.  It’s the second most common cause of cancer death in females.

How common is breast cancer?

 

1 in 8 women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of their lifetime. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 266,120 cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the US with 63,960 cases of non-invasive breast cancer, a rise from last year.

40,920 women and 480 men are expected to die this year of breast cancer.

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?

 

Risk factors for breast cancer include:

  • Age greater than 50
  • Family History
  • BRAC1 and BRAC2 genetic mutations
  • Alcohol use
  • Never been pregnant or becoming pregnant for the first time over 35 years old
  • Early menarche at age 11 or younger
  • Obesity, especially after menopause
  • Dense breasts
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Use of oral contraceptives
  • Previous “precancerous” tumors such as atypical hyperplasia
  • DES exposure
  • Previous radiation therapy

How is breast cancer staged?

 

Breast cancer is staged based on size of the tumor, if lymph nodes are affected and whether the cancer has spread to distant areas of the body.  Prognosis varies greatly on the stage.

 

Screen-Shot-2012-09-27-at-9.59.51-AM.png

IMAGE ABOVE FROM JOHNSTON HEALTH

 

Is family history a huge factor?

 

85% of breast cancer cases occur in women with NO family history.

Screening of breast cancer

 

Mammograms are the first line screening tool for breast cancer and are currently recommended biennial for women aged 50-74.  However for those at higher risk, mammogram screening should start earlier, with possible follow-up ultrasound, and be performed more regularly.

 

FullSizeRender (1)

3-D MAMMOGRAM IMAGE

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Another warning has been issued to adults and seniors who mix herbal remedies, over the counter supplements and prescription medications.

A study from the University of Hertfordshire in the UK found 44% of women and 22% of men surveyed mixed their prescription medications with herbal remedies and over the counter supplements.

Individuals may have changes in their metabolism and medication breakdown as they age causing variances in body absorption and efficacy of medications.  Adding supplements or herbal remedies could cause unpredictable reactions.

These effects could include:

  • Less efficacy of prescription medication causing poor blood pressure, sugar, heart rhythm control, for example)
  • Enhanced active compounds of medications taken (possibly causing overdose)
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Body aches
  • Jaundice
  • Blood thinning causing easy bleeding
  • Renal failure
  • Liver failure
  • Anemia
  • Mania and other personality changes
  • and  more

For example, St. John’s Wort could interfere with the effectiveness of one’s birth control and ginseng could worsen one's hypoglycemia if they are taking insulin.

Grapefruit juice could interfere with the metabolism of a statin, a popular medication used to decrease cholesterol. By raising its levels in the blood, one drink could cause a patient to have increased side effects such as muscle cramps and liver issues.

Iron supplements can interfere with one’s absorption of their thyroid medication, and ginkgo biloba, if taken with a blood pressure medication, could cause the blood pressure to drop even lower. Moreover it can increase bleeding if taken with an anticoagulant.

And if alcohol is mixed with any prescription medication, deadly side effects (such as respiratory depression when used with opiates) can ensue.

So the moral is, just because a supplement states is “natural,” or a frequently consumed food appears to be safe, its combination with medication could prove deadly.

Although the interactions are numerous, the AAFP created a table of common ones:

 

Herbal and Dietary Supplement–Drug Interactions

HERBAL OR DIETARY SUPPLEMENT

DRUG

COMMENT

RECOMMENDATION*

Patients taking oral anticoagulants

Cranberry (juice)

Warfarin (Coumadin)

Interaction possible based on seven reports of increased INR, although a clinical study showed no interactions47

Suspect an interaction if INR elevated

Fish oil

Warfarin

Interaction possible, with case reports showing an elevated INR, although a clinical study showed no effect of fish oil on anticoagulation status8,9

Suspect an interaction if INR elevated

Garlic

Warfarin

Interaction unlikely based on a clinical study that found garlic is relatively safe and poses no serious hemorrhagic risk for closely monitored patients taking warfarin oral anticoagulation therapy10

Suspect an interaction if bruising or bleeding occurs despite an appropriate INR

   

One review found no case reports of interactions with garlic and warfarin11

 

Ginkgo

Warfarin

Interaction possible, though controlled clinical studies show no effect of ginkgo on the kinetics or dynamics of warfarin12,13

Experts recommend caution, although available research does not support this conclusion

 

Aspirin

Interaction suspected based on four case reports of spontaneous bleeding14,15

Suspect an interaction if spontaneous bleeding occurs

Ginseng

Warfarin

Interaction possible based on conflicting research findings

Avoid combination if possible

   

American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius)reduces blood concentrations of warfarin16,17

 
   

Coadministration of warfarin with Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) did not affect the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of warfarin18

 

St. John’s wort

Warfarin

Interaction suspected based on decreases in INR in case reports and in a study in 12 healthy volunteers18

Evaluate warfarin response when St. John’s wort is initiated or stopped

Vitamin E (> 400 IU daily)

Warfarin

Interaction suspected based on a single patient (with rechallenge), resulting in an increase in INR19

Evaluate warfarin response when vitamin E is used in combination

   

One clinical trial showed no interaction20

 

Patients taking cardiovascular medications

Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) [corrected]

Digoxin

Possible increase in digoxin levels without clinical signs (case report)21

Monitor digoxin level when eleuthero is initiated or stopped [corrected]

St. John’s wort

Digoxin

Suspected decrease in digoxin levels without clinical signs in a controlled study22

Monitor digoxin level when St. John’s wort is initiated or stopped

 

Verapamil (Calan)

Interaction suspected based on decreased bioavailability in a study in eight healthy volunteers23

Increase verapamil dose, if necessary, if diminished response occurs

 

Statins

Interaction suspected based on decreased plasma blood levels in a clinical study24

Monitor serum lipid levels after St. John’s wort is added

Patients taking psychiatric medications

Ginkgo

Atypical antidepressant (trazodone [Desyrel])

Interaction possible based on one case report of coma25

Evaluate for emotional and/or behavioral changes in patient response after ginkgo is initiated or stopped

Ginseng

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors

Interaction possible based on two case reports of manic-like symptoms, headache, and tremulousness17

Avoid combination if possible

St. John’s wort

SSRIs

Interaction suspected based on case reports of drowsiness or serotonin syndrome26

Taper off St. John’s wort when initiating an SSRI

 

Benzodiazepines

Interaction suspected based on pharmacokinetic studies showing decreased serum levels (25 to 50 percent) without clinical signs2729

Adjust the dose of benzodiazepine as needed

 

Tricyclic antidepressants

Interaction possible based on decreased amitriptyline plasma levels but no clinical effects in a study of 12 depressed patients27,30

Monitor patient response after St. John’s wort is initiated or stopped

 


 

INR = International Normalized Ratio; SSRI = selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

*— All recommendations have a strength of recommendation taxonomy (SORT) evidence rating of C (consensus, disease-oriented evidence, usual practice, expert opinion, or case series). For information about the SORT evidence rating system, see https://www.aafp.org/afpsort.xml.

Information from references 4 through 30.

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Currently 5.7 million people in the US suffer from the debilitating cause of dementia and the CDC estimates close to 14 million will be affected by the year 2060.

As we’re surviving other illnesses that could take our lives sooner, such as heart disease and cancer, we as a population are living to an age where brain changes can occur.

Alzheimer’s is the 5th leading cause of death and scientists still struggle to find a cure or means to stave it off.

 

top-10-global-causes-of-deaths-2016.jpg

 

The average age of symptom revelation is 65, but researchers believe the disease may set in sooner. Over 200,000 currently suffer from early onset Alzheimer’s, or onset before age 65.

I believe nightly oxygen or CPAP therapy (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) might be worth researching as its been postulated that lack of oxygenation can accelerate dementia.

 

What is Alzheimer’s?

 

Alzheimer’s, a progressive disease in which the brain loses function, is most commonly associated with memory loss. As abnormal proteins build up in the brain (beta-amyloid and tau), the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the nerve cell (neuron), disrupt communication between nerve cells, so memory can easily start to falter. Many people affected with Alzheimer’s lose newer memories first and then progressively lose old ones.

Normal_vs_Alzheimers_Brain.jpg

However, since the brain is such a dynamic and brilliantly complex organ, a disease that alters its tissue could manifest in a variety of symptoms, beyond memory loss.

These can include:

  • Personality changes
  • Difficulty completing once simple tasks
  • Social withdrawal
  • Labile moods
  • Misplacing commonly used objects
  • Lack of appropriate judgement
  • Issues with problem solving
  • Lack of understanding of spatial and timing concepts

Hence if a family member appears to lose his way driving home, has difficulty dressing himself appropriately, avoids family gatherings, appears to get angry for no apparent reason, or even offers a young baby an object for a much older individual, these may be signs of a dementia such as Alzheimer’s.

Although Caucasians comprise the majority of cases overall, the CDC found among those over 65, African-Americans have the highest rate at nearly 14%, and Hispanics at 12%.

In a recent study, researchers from Northwestern University’s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center found four additional symptoms that may be early signs of Alzheimer’s. These include:

  • Difficulty with speech, vocabulary pool, process and articulating what one wants to say (aphasia)
  • Difficulty writing from a motor and conceptual standpoint
  • Difficulty reading, including comprehension
  • Displaying exaggerated confidence

The study authors state these signs may be overlooked and could be very telling of one’s early disease progression.

To diagnose Alzheimer’s, the medical provider may employ a variety of testing measures including basic history and physical, blood tests to rule out thyroid and vitamin deficiencies, lumbar puncture, CT Scans to rule out bleeds, masses, or stroke, MRI Brain scans, neuropsychological tests, and amyloid PET scans.

Although currently a cure for Alzheimer’s does not exist, there are many  medications being researched to slow down the progression of the disease and a variety of environmental and behavioral interventions could allow the patient to navigate easier with their challenges.

Can Daily Ibuprofen Prevent Alzheimer’s?

How to prevent Alzheimer’s remains up for debate, but healthy diet, weight, exercise, and control of one’s blood pressure and blood sugar have been suggested.

The earlier Alzheimer’s is diagnosed, the easier it may be to manage, hence family members need to learn and look out for the above symptoms.

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

 

 

 

 

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Are pap smears going away?

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For some yes, as new cancer screening guidelines suggest swapping the embarrassing procedure with HPV only tests. These HPV only tests can even be done in the privacy of one’s home.

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) suggest women between the ages of 30-65 may be screened for cervical cancer by testing for the HPV virus, high risk strains, every 5 years without undergoing a concurrent Pap smear. This is opposed to the “co-testing” recommended up until now. Women can, however, if desired, choose to have Pap smears every 3 years. These guidelines do not pertain to those who have cervical cancer or symptoms that could suggest a malignant process such as pain, bleeding and weight loss.

However one concern many physicians have is the lack of other testing being done during a “Pap Smear” visit.  Pelvic exams evaluating for gynecological pathology, breast exams, counseling and preventative health recommendations are often done during a woman’s physical and extending the testing intervals to twice a decade could put one at risk of another illness being missed.

Moreover, would an at home HPV test be sufficient enough to screen for cancer?  Smoking may also predispose one for cervical cancer so testing for the HPV virus alone may not be enough.

What is the cervix and what is cervical cancer?

 

The uterus looks similar to a light bulb.  The larger top portion being where the fetus develops, and the bottom, narrower area, the cervix.  The cervix thins and dilates during childbirth, as you’ve heard in the movies “she’s only 7 cm!” and then after childbirth becomes narrow again.  It affects nearly 12,000 and kills 4,000 women each year.  It can affect women of any age but is more common between 20 and 50.

 

375x321_cervix

HTTP://WWW.WEBMD.COM/WOMEN

 

What causes cervical cancer?

 

The most common cause is HPV (Human Papillomavirus), especially HPV-16 and HPV-18.  This is acquired through unprotected sex, so condom use is encouraged. Thus it's one of the most preventable causes of cancer.  Additionally, there are 3 vaccines for HPV currently approved by the FDA, Gardasil, Gardasil 9, and Cervarix.

What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?

 

Early cervical cancer may not be symptomatic but as it develops it may cause an odor, pain with urination, pelvic pain and bleeding. This bleeding may occur after sex, a pelvic exam, or intermittent bleeding not associated with a menstrual cycle.

Is cervical cancer treatable?

 

Yes.  Early detection is key and can be done by a Pap Smear, explained below.  Multiple treatments are available including surgery, chemotherapy,  radiation therapy, and targeted therapy such as Bevacizumab (Avastin®) which prevents new blood vessel growth that can feed a tumor.

Who should get screened for Cervical Cancer?

 

The USPSTF (United States Preventive Services Task Force) recommended the following:

Women aged 21 to 65 years

The USPSTF recommends for cervical cancer every 3 years with cervical cytology alone in women aged 21 to 29 years. For women aged 30 to 65 years, the USPSTF recommends screening every 3 years with cervical cytology alone, every 5 years with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing alone, or every 5 years with hrHPV testing in combination with cytology (cotesting).

 

See the Clinical Considerations section for the relative benefits and harms of alternative screening strategies for women 21 years or older.

A

Women older than 65 years

The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women older than 65 years who have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk for cervical cancer.

 

See the Clinical Considerations section for discussion of adequate prior screening and risk factors that support screening after age 65 years.

D

Women younger than 21 years

The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women younger than 21 years.

D

Women who have had a hysterectomy

The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women who have had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix and do not have a history of a high-grade precancerous lesion (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 2 or 3) or cervical cancer.

The first 3 recommendations apply to individuals who have a cervix, regardless of their sexual history or HPV vaccination status. These recommendations do not apply to individuals who have been diagnosed with a high-grade precancerous cervical lesion or cervical cancer. These recommendations also do not apply to individuals with in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol or those who have a compromised immune system (eg, women living with HIV).

 

What is a Pap Smear?

 

It is the cytology (cell analysis) of the cervix. Years ago, a cytobrush would collect the cells and the medical provider would “smear” it onto a slide, place fixative, and then send it to the laboratory for the pathologist to analyze it. Now ThinPrep® Pap tests are used more commonly as the cells from the brush are placed into a container with fixative, and this vial is sent to the pathologist to spin down and analyze.

 

cervical-smear-test-equipment-97358274-575db1493df78c98dc633c53

TEK IMAGE/SPL / GETTY IMAGES

 

In order to obtain the cells from the cervix, the medical provider needs to use a speculum to open the vaginal canal and allow access to the uterus.  A woman may be in the lithotomy position…lying on one’s back on the exam table with her feet in stirrups and knees bent. During the speculum exam, the medical provider may take cultures to test for common vaginal infections such as yeast, bacteria vaginosis, or sexually transmitted illnesses such as gonorrhea and chlamydia.  After the speculum exam, the provider may perform a pelvic exam with her gloved hand to examine the uterus and ovaries, evaluating for tenderness, shape, size and masses.

How is an HPV test done?

 

An HPV test can be done with the cells obtained during the Pap Smear.  At home tests require the patient to swab their vagina (female) or urethra (male) or rectum and then mail the swab to the lab.  The laboratory evaluates the cells to see if the HPV virus that causes cervical cancer is present.

In summary the thousands of deaths that occur each year to cervical cancer can be prevented with simple testing, such as the Pap Smear.  Discuss with your medical provider when cervical cancer screening is best for you.

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

 

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Flu season 2018 has begun

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Flu season has already begun, with three cases being reported in Western Massachusetts, and this year may be different from those past as the CDC has made multiple new recommendations and different options made available for the public. Let’s answer your questions.

When does flu season begin and how long does it last?

 

Flu season has begun already. It typically starts in the Fall, and ends late Spring.  So the range is described as October to May with it peaking December to March.

How bad will this flu season be?

 

It is difficult to predict, but already this early in the season we’ve had multiple flu related deaths reported by the CDC’s Flu View.

What is the flu?  How can one die from it?

 

The flu is caused by a virus. Multiple strains of virus’ can cause the flu.  The virus itself can be lethal, however the greatest risk comes with what it does to your immune system, thereby putting one at risk of secondary infections. Pneumonia is the number one cause of flu-related deaths.  Secondly, it can exacerbate existing conditions such as asthma, seizures, even promote preterm birth, hence those who are pregnant or have pre-existing medical conditions are urged to get vaccinated against the flu. Moreover those who qualify should get the pneumonia vaccine as well.

 

 

h1n1-swine-flu-virus

h1n1 virus

 

What does this year’s flu vaccine cover?

 

According to the CDC, the trivalent vaccine covers for these three strains of flu virus:

  • A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09–like virus
  • A/Singapore/INFIMH-16-0019/2016 (H3N2)-like virus
  • B/Colorado/06/2017–like virus (Victoria lineage)

Quadrivalent influenza vaccines will contain these three viruses and an additional influenza B vaccine virus, a B/Phuket/3073/2013–like virus (Yamagata lineage).

These vaccines are aimed at providing protection against the Swine flu, and some influenza A and B strains.

What about older individuals?

 

This year, those over 65 will have two options for their flu vaccine.

Fluzone High-Dose – a higher dose flu vaccine that will hopefully allow their immunity to protect against the flu longer

FLUAD – the trivalent flu vaccine with an adjuvant to stimulate more of an immune response.

Flublock Quadrivalent – provides protection against 4 strains.

What about the nasal spray vaccine?

 

This year, the CDC does allow use of the nasal spray vaccine as it has shown improved  efficacy from  prior years. However it is only recommended for  those who are between the ages of 2 and 49 and cannot be given to those who are pregnancy or who have compromising medical conditions as outlined by the CDC.

Who should get the flu shot?

 

All individuals 6 months old and older unless specified by their medical provider.

What if I’m allergic to eggs?

 

Most individuals allergic to eggs can still get the flu vaccine, but if the allergy to eggs is severe (anaphylaxis, angioedema, difficulty breathing), the CDC recommends notifying your medical provider and being in a facility to monitor you if you do get the flu vaccine.

Will I get the flu from the flu shot?

 

No.  The flu vaccine has a “killed” version of the virus meaning it’s not an active virus (as opposed to a live attenuated vaccine, a weakened down version of it). A “killed” or “inactivated” vaccine merely has the pathogen particles to induce an immune response. Additionally, when one states they got the flu despite the flu shot it could be that the flu shot only protects against 3 – 4 strains and they were infected with a more rare strain not covered by the vaccine.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

 

The average effectiveness each year hovers around 60%. Last year’s efficacy was much lower and this year’s has not been predicted as of yet. Australia is still reporting active cases on their Department of Health website.

I feel sick after the flu shot, why?

 

For some, the immune response that ensues can make one feel mildly ill, but should not resemble the flu. Those who state they got the flu “immediately” after receiving the shot, might have already been exposed and had not had a chance to produce immunity prior to their exposure.

 

sneezing

 

What are symptoms of the flu? How is it different from a cold?

 

A cold comes on slower and less severe. Flu symptoms are more abrupt and can include:

  • Fever
  • Body Aches
  • Cough
  • Sneezing
  • Sore Throat
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

 

Are there medications to treat the flu? Will antibiotics work?

 

There are antiviral medications available, such as Tamiflu, to treat the flu.  Antibiotics, however, will not work since the flu is not caused by a bacteria but rather a virus. However if a secondary bacterial infection takes over, antibiotics may be used.

How can I prevent getting the flu?

 

Besides vaccination, avoid being around those who are sick, thorough hand washing, and take good care of yourself. A balanced diet, exercise and sleep regimen can help boost your immune system.

Wishing you health this season!

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

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Stem cell regeneration paradigm

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Everyone fractionally clones themselves into a new body every night in stage 4 sleep, when stem cells wake and rebuild all organs and tissues. They need the 300 plus building blocks and six plus hormones to accomplish this process. Thus, everyone past seven years old is a fractional copy of themselves, based on their informational template in genetics and epigenetics. Everyone is a seven year old!

 

During sleep, the brain sends signals to the stem cells to rebuild every organ and tissue of the body at night. These signals are transmitted through the telomeres on the end of chromosomes to the ion channels that turn on the induction of messenger RNA. If all of the 300 biomolecules and 6+ hormones are present, the body can regenerate itself and fractionally clone into a new body every seven years every seven years, every seven years. Deliver performs and supplies some of the biomolecules such as retinol for the eye to be able to see and perform vision, but most of biomolecules are not present and therefore the process of photocopying or copping the body into a new cell and tissue structure is deficient and results in the process we call aging.



Life is a dance between biophotons from the telomere at the end of your chromosomes and ion channels that let into the nucleoplasm holding DNA and allowing minerals and amino acids to stimulate production of mRNA to make structural proteins and enzymes. Epigenetic origami makes all tissues, organs and individual persons.

 

7% of our DNA codes for 32,500 proteins which are structural or enzymatic. Enzymes are folded proteins around a model atomic mineral to make or break bonds. The other 93% of DNA was considered harmonic or resident DNA and previously was referred to as junk DNA. This form of DNA is the structural diagram of how to build organs and tissues and may be considered epigenetic origami hierarchical DNA. As a result of this process all living things depend on the present production of structural proteins and enzymes and the nonlinear stochastic fuzzy logic parallel processing information transfer across ion channels membranes in real time in picoseconds to regulate the size and structure of organs in real time.

 

We can optimize the fractional cloning process by providing substance and signal to optimize the dance of LIFE. NutriMed formulas and Red Deer Velvet DR, pat pending, can provide these building blocks, minerals and amino acids. Lumen Inlight and eGFT epiGenetic Frequency Therapy can provide the biophoton stimulus to permit entry via ion channels and DNA induction of messenger RNA, mRNA, to make the template for enzymes and structural proteins.

 

Linus Pauling, father of DNA and Stereochemistry, completed a lifetime of research showing plasma mineral resonance can induce healthy adaptation and genetic induction to provide healing proteins and enzymes for organs and tissues. Dr Bill Deagle now can provide these customized formulas based on Quantum Information Body QRMA and Metapathia scans, lab kits and imaging, and functional history review. EpiGenetic signals can open ion channels and stimulate cellular communication and augment the information hologram of a healthy organ and body, regenerating you into a new better copy of your DNA and epiGenetic template of you! Take advantage of a consult, testing, and customized regenerative services to be the best you can be tomorrow and many years to come!

 

Future weekly articles, will be presented here to A4 M to instill a new broader picture of what the dance of life is as a dance between bio photons and ion channels controlling the informational holographic body that produces the process we call life. His hope of these articles will inspire new science look in the informational body that is pressing into and in control of the enzymatic and structural body. My research has shown that harmonic frequencies and picomoles microamps and mappable the body and are deterministic of whether specific organs and tissues can receive in metastasis or allowed autoimmune disease or process to occur. There is often decide anomia associated with a resident changes in the thermographic evaluation at the skin and therefore the informational body is more important than has been previously identified and quantum testing of different frequency patterns of the body can determine whether disease or wellness is permitted by the specific resident frequencies.

 

 

Be Well,

 

Dr. Bill.

 

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Doctor Bill Deagle is a guest contributor to GCN news. His views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are his own. Doctor Deagle, MD, is a member of AAEM (American Academy of Emergency Medicine), The ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) and the A4M (The American Anti-Aging Association). His radio program, The Nutrimedical Report, is nationally syndicated live, M-F (2:00 pm - 5:00 pm - central) at GCN.

 

 

 

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National Blood Donation Week

Written by

Editor’s note: Technically, National Blood Donation Day was September 5th, as Doc D. notes. BUT National Blood Donation week continues through this weekend so here you go.

This year September 5th is National Blood Donation Day.  Blood banks all across America are holding drives to increase our nation’s blood supply.

Governors from nearly all states have proclaimed State Blood Donation Days to show their support.

blood donation.jpg

Every two seconds, someone needs blood.

The American Red Cross provides these startling statistics:

  • Approximately 36,000 units of red blood cells are needed every day in the U.S.
  • Nearly 7,000 units of platelets and 10,000 units of plasma are needed daily in the U.S.
  • Nearly 21 million blood components are transfused each year in the U.S.
  • The average red blood cell transfusion is approximately 3 pints.
  • The blood type most often requested by hospitals is type O.
  • Sickle cell disease affects 90,000 to 100,000 people in the U.S. About 1,000 babies are born with the disease each year. Sickle Cell patients can require blood transfusions throughout their lives.
  • According to the American Cancer Society, about 1.7 million people are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in 2017. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.
  • A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood.

We wear red today to show our support.

To donate blood visit the following sites:

United Blood Services/BloodHero.com

American Red Cross Blood Drive Locator

Donating blood is a simple process that takes less than 45 minutes.  For those who cannot donate blood, hosting a drive can be just as life saving and easy to do.  Blood banks can host a drive at work on site or through a bloodmobile in the parking lot, with no cost to the host.

UBS-Mobile-Unit.jpg

__________________________________________________

National Blood Donation Week

Almost all of the United States have declared State Blood Donation Days to help combat our nation’s blood shortage as part of National Blood Donation Week (NBDW).

This year National Blood Donation Week is September 3-10th with September 5th being National Blood Donation Day.

The movement began in 2015 when Nationally Syndicated Radio Host, and local KDWN radio personality, asked Governor Brian Sandoval to proclaim Nevada Blood Donation Day to help fight the state’s blood shortage. The next year she took this movement national asking all governors to proclaim state blood donation days.

From our September 4th post:

Governors in just about every state have already proclaimed September 5th to be their state Blood Donation Day for 2018.

Oklahoma has proclaimed the month of September - Blood Donation Month.

Alaska proclaimed the month of July - Blood Donation Month.

“Blood and platelet donations are currently being distributed to hospitals as fast as donations are coming in, and more donations are needed, especially type O, to replenish the blood supply,” said Laurie Nehring, communications director for the American Red Cross. “We appreciate Dr. Daliah’s efforts to educate the public about the importance of regular blood donations.”

Emergency rooms treating trauma victims, hospitals treating anemic patients, and medical clinics replenishing low blood levels in cancer patients require a steady supply of blood products.

38% of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood but less than 10% actually do.

“The unified effort across America to proclaim state blood donation days around the Labor Day holiday comes at an important time for patients,” said Mitzy Edgecomb, Blood Systems Vice President, Donor Marketing & Communication. “Blood donations often drop dramatically during the summer months and over holiday weeks when regular donors take time away to enjoy family vacations.  We appreciate and applaud the governors from the multiple states who have called attention to the ongoing need for blood donations and thank those who step forward to make a life-transforming impact on others by giving blood.”

Donating blood is easy and takes less than one hour.  Many places of work can hold blood drives so employees don’t have to take off work (plus you get yummy cookies).

blood-drive

Inconsistent donation patterns during the year result in unpredictable and reliable blood supply numbers, hence donation is requested year round.

United Blood Services suggests donating three times a year.

The summer and holiday season appear to be the “dryest” in terms of donations.  States and regions frequently need to ship blood to areas who are in need.

Blood supplies have been critical in many parts of the country due to natural disasters such as storms and wildfires.

What makes NBDW so unique is that both Republican and Democratic governors are uniting and coming together for a common cause.

One pint of blood has the potential to save three lives.  Imagine what the whole country can do!

blood bags

For a list of Governor Proclamations visit here.

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

A study has found those who grill meat on charcoal, wood, or coal have a 12% increase risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke or heart failure.

Researchers from the University of Oxford studied 341,000 people in China, measuring their exposure to cooking mediums and their risk of heart death (8,300 died of heart disease unrelated to smoking and other factors). They additionally found that for every decade after one switched to cooking with gas or electric, their risk factor lowered by 5%.

Study authors suggest if one would switch to a gas or electric grill, the risk could be reversible.  Daily Mail reports the following:

PEOPLE WHO HAD SWITCHED 10 OR MORE YEARS AGO SAW THEIR RISK SINK BACK TO LEVEL WITH PEOPLE WHO HAD ALWAYS USED ‘CLEAN’ ENERGY.
PROFESSOR ZHENGMING CHEN ADDED: ‘SWITCHING TO ELECTRICITY OR GAS WEAKENED THE IMPACT OF PREVIOUS SOLID FUEL USE, SUGGESTING THAT THE NEGATIVE ASSOCIATION MAY BE REVERSIBLE.’

 

 

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Last Spring, scientists found grilling may increase one’s risk of high blood pressure.  In this study, reported by medical xpress, they found high blood pressure risk to be:

  • 17 PERCENT HIGHER IN THOSE WHO GRILLED, BROILED, OR ROASTED BEEF, CHICKEN OR AND FISH MORE THAN 15 TIMES/MONTH, COMPARED WITH LESS THAN 4 TIMES A MONTH.
  • 15 PERCENT HIGHER IN THOSE WHO PREFER THEIR FOOD WELL DONE, COMPARED WITH THOSE WHO PREFER RARER MEATS.
  • 17 PERCENT HIGHER IN THOSE ESTIMATED TO HAVE CONSUMED THE HIGHEST LEVELS OF HETEROCYCLIC AROMATIC AMINES (HAAS) – CHEMICALS FORMED WHEN MEAT PROTEIN IS CHARRED OR EXPOSED TO HIGH TEMPERATURES – COMPARED TO THOSE WITH THE LOWEST INTAKE.
  • Standing NEXT to a Grill Can Increase Cancer Risk

Chinese researchers find the smoke released during grilling to expose one to cancer- causing chemicals.

As we head into the summer, grilling burgers, hotdogs, and steaks are a favorite pastime.  But a small study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology suggests PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), produced during grilling, are inhaled and absorbed through the skin, potentially causing genetic mutations that may cause cancer.

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The study, out of Guangzhou, China, found those consuming the grilled meat had the highest exposure to PAH’s. Next came those exposed through skin, and finally those inhaling the smoke to be at next greatest risk.

Clothing provided some protection, but once smoke saturated, should be removed to lessen exposure.

The average person is considered safe if they grill in moderation, but excessive exposure could put them at higher risk of PAH-induced cancers such as lung, bladder and skin cancers.

For more on the study read here.

The heating of foods to high temperatures can cause chemical reactions among the amino acids, fats and sugars in foods, producing toxic substances.  Acrylamide, as discussed below, can be formed when heating starches such as potatoes, to high levels.

What is acrylamide?

 

Acrylamide is a chemical used in many industrial products that produce plastics, adhesives, food packaging and the treatment of drinking water.  It can also be produced when foods are heated, fried, baked, or roasted to above 120 degrees Celsius (248 degrees Fahrenheit).  In 2002 reports came out regarding acrylamide in french fries, and in 2013 the FDA issued guidance to the food industry on how to minimize producing the chemical.

Roasting coffee requires the beans to be heated to close to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. This heat produces a chemical reaction between the amino acid asparagine and sugars resulting in the formation of acrylamide.

The amounts however are miniscule. Much smaller than other modes of acrylamide exposure such as cigarette smoking and exposure at work when working in industries that use acrylamide such as plastics, food processing, mining, paper, agriculture and construction.

What can acrylamide do?

 

In rodents, acrylamide was found to increase several types of cancer. But the doses were 1,000-10,000 times greater than what the average human is exposed to.

According to the American Cancer Society, most of the studies done so far have not found an increased risk of cancer in humans. For some types of cancer, such as kidney, ovarian and endometrial cancer, the results have been mixed, but there are currently no cancer types for which there is clearly an increased risk related to acrylamide intake.

How do I decrease exposure?

 

As noted earlier, acrylamide can be in a variety of products we use throughout the day.  Large quantities, however, can be consumed through cigarette smoke, hence avoiding smoking is key.  Moreover, avoiding frying foods, especially starches, greater than 120 degrees Celsius/248 degrees Fahrenheit if possible. Frying and or toasting to a light gold, rather than crispy dark brown color, may limit your exposure as well.

 

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But keep in mind, numerous studies have found coffee drinkers to lower their risk of cancer, especially liver, uterine, prostate and mouth cancer. However 4-6 cups had to be consumed in order for researchers to notice a benefit.

More research still needs to be done on all fronts when it comes to grilling mediums, crispiness of our cooking and coffee. So while we wait for the verdict let’s kick back with something safe…..I guess a cup of water??

 

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

Last year we learned that some patients, who were evaluated for a stroke or transient ischemic attack when they had come to the ER complaining of recurrent “temporary blindness” after checking their smartphone in the dark were suffering from a phenomenon, known as ‘smartphone blindness.’ This has also been experienced by many of us when we have the sensation of dimmed vision or poor visual acuity, feeling punished for peeking at our email when we should be sleeping.

 

But now we have a study suggesting vision loss could be permanent due to the blue light being emitted from our smartphones or laptops.

Researchers from the University of Toledo found blue light will react with retinal, an active form of Vitamin A, that can damage the nearby cells they are designed to stimulate when creating sight.

Researcher Kasun Ratnayake states, “If you shine blue light on retinal, the retinal kills photoreceptor cells as the signaling molecule on the membrane dissolves,” and since these cells do not regenerate they are gone for good.

Although a blue-light induced retinal activated cell could prove useful when fighting cancer, this finding is worrisome as millions of people, including children, look at their smartphone and tablet in the dark, depending on the blue light more and more to see their screens.

blue light danger for retina

What is blue light?

Sunlight is made up of the spectrum of colors including red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple.  Blue light is a light along the spectrum that has shorter wavelengths and more energy than red, which has longer wavelengths. We receive most of our blue light exposure from the sun but we can be exposed as well through our smart devices, LED lights and CFL (compact fluorescent light) bulbs.

 

spectrum

IMAGE FROM PREVENTBLINDNESS.ORG

Smartphone use linked to retinal detachment

Studies surfaced a few years ago where great lengths of smartphone use can cause retinal detachment.  In these cases the layer of the retina which focuses images, detaches from the back of the eye, causing serious vision loss. Though there are treatments, if not treated early can cause permanent blindness in the affected eye since the retina loses its blood and oxygen supply when detached. A woman from China had been using her smartphone for 2-3 hours in the dark each night when this occurred.

Smartphones have also been linked to myopia, near-sightedness, and sleeping disorders as the blue light emitted from the screen can disrupt melatonin production.

A recent study found that 30% of adults spend more than 9 hours a day using their smartphone. Physicians recommend avoiding extended use, adjust settings to black text on white background, and with this recent case study, use both eyes to look at the screen when using the phone at night.

Smartphone, Street Lamp Blue Light May Increase Risk of Cancer

A study from the University of Exeter and Barcelona Institute for Global Health finds blue light exposure at night-time to increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer.

Blue light is emitted from artificial lighting, such as LED’s and smart devices, and has been linked in the past to cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Why?  Scientists believe the blue wavelengths in the light disrupt our circadian rhythm, or our body’s biological clock, by suppressing the secretion of melatonin. Poor sleep, and unpredictable body cycles, can affect our metabolism, hence our weight, diabetes risk and cancer risk.

In this study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers reviewed data of more than 4000 patients, between the ages of 20 and 85, from 11 different geographical regions. They found exposure to blue light at night doubled the risk of prostate cancer in men, and increased breast cancer risk in women by 1.5.

The Sun reports study author Dr. Alejandro Sánchez de Miguel is urging to reduce exposure to outside street lights and use orange wavelength light rather than blue.

“The take-home message is: Use warm orange lights where possible, and shutters and blinds to block street light.

“Also, our findings suggest reducing your night-time exposure to smartphones and tablets could help cut cancer risk.

How to protect your eyes by minimizing blue light exposure

The recommendation to not use your smart device at night may not be very practical for many.  So here are some additional tips:

Increasing the size of the font helps your eyes since they don’t need to strain as much to read.  Try to look at your smartphone with a distance of 1 1/2 feet. Blinking often helps rest the eyes as well and keeps them lubricated and moist.

Screen time should be limited in the evenings.  Avoid computer/phone screens at least 2-3 hours before bed.

Although LED light bulbs are more energy-efficient, bedroom lighting may need to be swapped for softer bulbs.

If the weather permits, getting some night air and watching the stars may help stimulate one’s melatonin, allowing him/her to get sleepy.

Blue-blocking glasses may help limit exposure if night computer work cannot be avoided.

Additionally there are apps that allow a blue light filter on one’s phone screen.

Finally its good to use the 20,20,20 rule.  After every 20 minutes of use, look away at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.  This may help avoid eye strain from excessive smartphone use.

 

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news, her views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are her own. Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.  The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.

 

The heart provides one-third of pump power to tissues, with the secondary vascular peristaltic pressure provided by aorta and major and minor arteries and vascular bed. The mitochondrial contraction depends on energetics of mitochondria in the heart and medial arterial layer generating ATP and NADH. This process needs fuel and removal of toxins that harm the heart with free radicals and homocysteine, crosslinked proteins with sugar, and oxidized cholesterol and partially hydrogenated fatty acids in the diet. With the proper protocols of NutriMeds and diet, healthy perfusion of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and organs proceeds.  

 

All blood return to the heart is healthy vascular contraction of venules, veins and inferior and superior vena cava to the right heart and from the right ventricle to the oxygenating lung membranes. Support for heart and vessels regenerative NutriMeds, biomolecules for anti-aging, special CoQ10 formula (Editor’s note: Coenzyme Q10 [CoQ10] is an antioxidant that your body produces naturally but levels in your body decrease as you age. CoQ10 is found in meat, fish and whole grains. The amount of CoQ10 found in these dietary sources, however, isn't enough to significantly increase CoQ10 levels in your body and so cardiologists often recommend a supplement, which are available as capsules, tablets and by IV. CoQ10 might help treat certain heart conditions, as well as migraines and Parkinson's disease.) and carnitine and mitochondrial energetics, and DNA induction peptides and epigenetic photochromic light therapy and frequency therapy can restore blood pressure, perfusion, stop plaque formation and maintain healthy organ perfusion and oxygenation and detoxification.

 

Perfusion tests include the Endo Pat and Endo Felix test technologies developed at the Technion Institute in Israel and now available with cardiologists across America and other countries. These measure blood flow to the fingertips or temperature that describe perfusion to the peripheral tissues to determine if perfusion is impaired or not.

 

The next group of tests includes analysis of factors associated with blood viscosity, lipid electrophoresis and cardiac markers for developing plaque or vascular disease. Specific federal certified labs can do these tests now and identify specific factors that can be altered through nutritional supplements and dietary factors. Other technologies are now available also to improve vascular health such as VasoMedical EECP (extracorporeal counterpulsation therapy). This technology is capable of inducing new coronary vessel growth to remove angina and decreased cardiac and peripheral perfusion.

 

By supplying anti-inflammatory fatty acids, nutritional factors to prevent plaque formation, improve tissue perfusion and nitric oxide generation, as well as energetics for the contraction of the heart and blood vessels, incidence of vascular events such as heart attack stroke and embolism can significantly be reduced. These approaches lower blood pressure, improve perfusion, and prevent end organ damage. This of also reduces significantly the need or dependence on pharmaceutical approaches but relies more on metabolic and nutritional support and other technologies to improve tissue perfusion and vascular health. As an example vascular blockages can be reversed in the periphery as well is in the heart, changing ischemic attacks can be stopped, and angina and heart attack can be significantly reduced or eliminated.

 

Consults with Dr Bill and Order Wellness Support can be found @ NutriMedical.com or at 888-212-8871.

 

Be Well,

 

Dr. Bill.

 

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Doctor Bill Deagle is a guest contributor to GCN news. His views and opinions, medical or otherwise, if expressed, are his own. Doctor Deagle, MD, is a member of AAEM (American Academy of Emergency Medicine), The ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) and the A4M (The American Anti-Aging Association). His radio program, The Nutrimedical Report, is nationally syndicated live, M-F (2:00 pm - 5:00 pm - central) at GCN.

 

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