News & Information

News & Information

The National Hockey League (NHL) owners have decided not to send the best hockey players in the world to South Korea for the 2018 Olympics because they’re “unhappy with the league shutting down for weeks to take part in the Olympic tournament every four years,” according to ESPN senior writer Scott Burnside. The owners were seeking more money to justify stopping the season and sending the best hockey players in the world to the Olympics. The decision makes the 2018 Olympic hockey tournament an amateur tournament, which will still be well-viewed but won’t come close to the potential ratings that would have resulted if the best hockey players in the world actually participated. Do you remember watching the Olympic basketball tournament before the Dream Team? Could you imagine going back to playing the Olympic basketball tournament with amateurs? That is what the NHL owners have done. New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist said it was “disappointing news” on Twitter, and the NHL Players’ Association called the decision “shortsighted.” It certainly doesn’t allow for growth of the NHL’s fanbase, as the Olympics would have put NHL players on a bigger stage in front of a larger audience. NHL owners have repeatedly failed fans, with a lockout occurring in 2012 that made me lose interest in the league just as I was growing to love hockey. I didn’t watch a single regular season game that year after falling in love with the Stanley Cup Playoffs the previous season. I did watch the…
Another study has found NSAIDS, commonly purchased over the counter, to increase risk of cardiac arrest. Non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) include ibuprofen and diclofenac. These medications are seen in products under the brand name Motrin and Voltaren, respectively. This class of medications is one of the most popular as they help consumers treat a variety of ailments including helping to relieve pain, inflammation and lower fever. Moreover they are inexpensive and many do not require a prescription at the lower doses. However, their chronic use has been linked to serious medical complications such as ulcers, kidney failure and cardiac issues. This week, a study published in the March issue of European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy found NSAID use (specifically Ibuprofen and diclofenac) to increase the chance of cardiac arrest. The researchers from the Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte in Denmark reviewed close to 30,000 cases of people who suffered cardiac arrest out of the hospital during the years 2001 and 2010 and found NSAID use. Diclofenac, specifically, carried a 50 percent increased risk of cardiac arrest. COX-2 selective inhibitors, such as Celebrex and Naproxen (Aleve) were NOT associated with increased risk in this particular study. According to the study author, Professor Gunnar H. Gislason, professor of cardiology, “the findings are a stark reminder that NSAIDs are not harmless. “Diclofenac and ibuprofen, both commonly used drugs, were associated with significantly increased risk of cardiac arrest. NSAIDs should be used with caution and for a valid indication. They should probably be avoided…
Despite being the Minnesota Twins best hitter, and one of the best in all of baseball during Spring Training, ByungHo Park will not be on the field with the Twins at Target Field on Opening Day. Park, who hit .353 with six home runs and 13 RBI in Spring Training, was optioned to AAA Rochester. Park didn’t do himself any favors in his first season in America. After dominating the hitter-friendly Korean Baseball Organization, Park hit just .191 with 12 home runs and struck out 80 times in 244 plate appearances (a .275 on-base percentage) last season. But Park sustained a wrist injury on May 13, 2016, that clearly affected him at the plate. He was hitting .245/.324/.582 before the injury and over the next 33 games posted a slash line of .145/.233/.265. In the offseason Park was placed on waivers by the Twins, which allowed the team to put reliever Matt Belisle on the 40-man roster. Belisle had an uncharacteristically good 2016. His career WHIP (walks and hits per inning pitched) is 1.357, and it was 1.087 last year. The last and only time his WHIP was that low was seven years ago. Belisle’s 2016 FIP (fielding independent pitching) was nearly a run lower than his career FIP. So now that Park is not on the 40-man roster, the Twins had a convenient way of demoting him despite winning the designated hitter gig over the injured Kennys Vargas. Switch-hitting outfielder Robbie Grossman will be the Opening Day DH because…
Doesn’t it always seem like your smartphone battery starts dying when you’re due for an upgrade? Same with your car, right? Once the warranty is up something goes wrong. Well, fear not. There’s a way to make your smartphone last longer than you will. A little website called iFixit.com that started as a mine for DIY tech tutorials has grown into the DIY tech preservation tool and parts shop. It’s the first shopping experience that’s nearly brought me tears of joy. I’ve long been a user of iFixit but seldom had reason to pay them. All I needed was information. I once revived a long dead Apple iBook and managed to do some of my favorite writing on it thanks to the tutorials at iFixit. I used iFixit again to repair my dad’s theater projector. It just needed a good cleaning, and iFixit told me exactly what I needed to remove and in what order to thoroughly clean it. Now iFixit is not only supplying DIY tech tutorials online but the tools necessary to preserve your technology. I have an Apple iPhone 6 and just blew off Verizon after a dozen years as a customer. I got a month’s worth of Straight Talk and figured I’d deal with it on a month-to-month basis for the first time. Verizon did its best to retain my loyalty by lowering my bill to $55 per month for 5 GB of 4G LTE data and unlimited talk and text. Straight Talk is $45 per…
Congress has sent President Donald Trump legislation ending internet privacy protections. When Trump signs the bill, internet providers will be able to monitor their customers’ personal and financial information to sell highly targeted advertising. The online advertising market is worth $83 billion according to emarketer.com, surpassing the television advertising market for the first time last year, so there is plenty of reason internet service providers (ISPs) want to sell your web history. But you need not worry. There are ways to retain your online privacy. I have recently purchased what’s called a virtual private network service (VPN), which establishes a secure connection with an endpoint somewhere else on the internet so your ISP won’t know what you’re doing. If your internet privacy is worth $3 per month, I’d highly recommend purchasing a VPN service. Here are some VPN options compared on CNET. You can even make anonymous payments with Bitcoin or Skrill if you’re nervous about paying for the service with your debit or credit card. If you’re not willing to pay for online privacy, it’s suggested you log out of any search engine before searching, because once you log on to Google or Yahoo or Bing, a profile is created to store your web history so they can sell it to advertisers. SaferVPN.com also suggests you use your browser’s privacy mode available through your browser’s settings. This restricts your browser from saving your web history in its cache while disabling tracking cookies. If you’re still nervous about using search…
Despite a 3-2 overtime loss to the Detroit Red Wings, the Minnesota Wild clinched its fifth consecutive playoff appearance on Sunday thanks to a loss by the Los Angeles Kings. The Wild have been falling like a hockey player in figure skates, losing nine of their last 11 games and allowing the Blackhawks to run away with the top seed in the Western Conference. Minnesota has been a wildly different team since the acquisitions of giant center Martin Hanzal and right-handed forward Ryan White from Arizona. Wild general manager Chuck Fletcher added Hanzal and White to get physical with the likes of Jonathan Toews, Ryan Getzlaf, Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin in the playoffs, but a scoring slump has the Wild reeling. Since the trade the Wild have managed to win just five of 17 games. While Hanzal has scored twice in his last 14 games, and White has put up a goose egg in the last 12, they aren’t the only ones struggling. In fact, it’s hard to find someone who isn’t. Chris Stewart has just two goals in his last 27 games. Charlie Coyle has four goals in his last 38 games. Erik Haula has just one goal in 19 games, Jared Spurgeon has scored twice in 23 games, and Jason Pominville also has just two goals in 21 games. It gets worse. Jonas Brodin hasn’t scored in 32 games. Miko Koivu has just two goals in 24 games. Nino Niederreiter has scored once in 21 games. Ryan…
The Minnesota Twins announced today details for their newly released mobile-based Student Pass program for the upcoming season, exclusively available using MLB.com's Ballpark app. The Twins Student Pass will allow students to receive $5 Ballpark Access (no seating) tickets for all Wednesday home games, with tickets delivered directly to their mobile device. In addition, students can receive a free ride pass from Metro Transit, available at twinsbaseball.com/student. "We're pleased to offer students this great program, which is conveniently available through their mobile device," said Mike Clough, Twins senior vice president of ticket sales and service. "This is a great opportunity for students to enjoy Twins baseball in a fun and affordable way." To sign up, students can visit twinsbaseball.com/student or text STUDENT to 51655. From there, they will receive a text message the day the offer becomes available. They will then click on the link to redeem the offer. To receive the tickets, participants will need the MLB.com Ballpark app, which is available via the Apple App Store and on Google Play. In addition to their Student Day tickets, other purchased tickets, as well as the ticket barcode will be available through the app leaving no need to print tickets. Twins Student Day is presented by Rasmussen College. The MLB.com Ballpark app is your mobile companion when visiting Target Field. The official MLB ballpark application perfectly complements and personalizes your trip to Target Field with digital ticketing, mobile check-in, social media, offers, rewards and exclusive content. Target Field also offers…
For better or worse, Britain's exit from the European Union (EU) begins. In the morning of March 29th, 2017, the British representative to the EU handed in the UK’s separation papers to the President of the European Council in Brussels. You see, the institutions of the EU are headquartered in Brussels, a city now famous for three things: Belgian Beer, Mr. JCVD himself (the “Muscles from Brussels”) and the labyrinthine bureaucracy of the EU. Once such point of bureaucracy is Article 50 from the 2009 Lisbon Treaty which lays the groundwork for any EU member to, “withdraw from the Union in accordance with its own constitutional requirements … shall negotiate and conclude an agreement with that State, setting out the arrangements for its withdrawal, taking account of the framework for its future relationship with the Union.” Until now, no state within the EU has invoked Article 50. Greece debated the idea as recent recessions, three recent public healthcare meltdowns and bailouts that seem to have done Greece more bad than good. It seems reasonable the Greeks would want change, but they never actually invoked Article 50. (New York Times coverage Explaining Greece’s Debt Crisis). As for Brexit, England and Wales, they voted “yes.” Northern Ireland and Scotland voted “no:” Why not let England and Wales leave the EU and the other two countries remain? That seems fair. Not that fairness has much to do with the complex international treaties that govern the EU but, whatever. So, here we are, and…
The Twin Cities welcome Derek Falvey, the new chief baseball officer for the Minnesota Twins. Tyler Kepner of the New York Times profiles Falvey’s quick rise from scouting prospects in the Cape Cod League to running Minnesota’s baseball operations at the age of 34. Falvey, a former college pitcher who never hit 90 miles per hour with his fastball, is tasked with turning around a Twins pitching staff that has historically pitched to contact and was second to last in ERA during the 2016 season. Falvey’s first move to help pitchers Ervin Santana, Phil Hughes, Kyle Gibson and Hector Santiago was to sign pitch-framing catcher Jason Castro to a three-year, $24.5 million dollar deal. Castro would rather you call what he does “receiving,” though, as reported by Parker Hageman of Twins Daily. He told Hageman that pitch-framing isn’t stealing strikes by tricking the plate umpire, but giving the umpire a clear view of the pitch and getting strikes called on pitches that are in the strike zone. Castro’s former club, the Astros, have been one of the best in baseball at getting strikes called on pitches thrown in the strike zone. Fangraphs’ Travis Sawchik recently ranked the Twins catching corps 22nd in the league for 2017. They were ranked 25th last year with old-schooler Kurt Suzuki behind the plate. According to Baseball Reference, Suzuki was 18 runs below league average defensively over 1,200 innings while Castro was five runs above league average last season. Both players were slightly below average…
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