News & Information

News & Information

A recent study out of Denmark finds frequent and prolonged use of ibuprofen to affect men’s fertility and sex drive. Researchers out of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark found 600 mg of ibuprofen (three 200mg over the counter tablets) twice a day for 6 weeks could have an anti-androgenic effect, meaning decrease the effect of man’s testosterone. The “compensated hypogonadism” reported, caused by a depletion of sex hormones, was seen within two weeks of the ibuprofen use. This can result in loss of libido and a decrease in sperm production. Long term sequelae could include hair loss and decrease in muscle mass. Fortunately, this effect was reversible once medication use ceased. According to the study of 31 males between the ages of 18 and 35, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the following was reported: In the men, luteinizing hormone (LH) and ibuprofen plasma levels were positively correlated, and the testosterone/LH ratio decreased. Using adult testis explants exposed or not exposed to ibuprofen, we demonstrate that the endocrine capabilities from testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells, including testosterone production, were suppressed through transcriptional repression. This effect was also observed in a human steroidogenic cell line. Our data demonstrate that ibuprofen alters the endocrine system via selective transcriptional repression in the human testes, thereby inducing compensated hypogonadism. LH stimulates the testicles to secrete testosterone. Since LH is a hormone produced by the pituitary, low testosterone levels mean the inhibitory effect of the…
While United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded Obama-era, federal protections for recreational marijuana businesses and users in states that have adopted legal cannabis legislation, that won’t affect states’ medical marijuana providers and users -- at least until Jan. 19. Indications are that medical marijuana will be off the table when it comes to the Justice Department’s crackdown on cannabis. President Donald Trump went on the record in support of medical marijuana prior to the election, so it’s unlikely Sessions would act in a manner that could jeopardize his President’s reelection chances any further. But if Congress can’t come to an agreement to fund the government before Jan. 19, the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment prohibiting the Justice Department from spending federal funds to interfere with states’ implementation and enforcement of medical cannabis laws will expire. The Rohrabacher-Farr amendment must be renewed each fiscal year to remain in effect, and is usually done so through omnibus spending bills. It was most recently renewed in a stopgap spending bill on Dec. 22, which expires Jan. 19. So if Congress fails to pass a budget for the fiscal year or at least another stopgap spending bill to fund the government temporarily, medical marijuana providers and patients will no longer be protected by Rohrabacher-Farr and subject to federal prosecution. Sessions is making sure the Justice Department is prepared for the opportunity to enforce federal cannabis law. He appointed 17 interim U.S. attorneys general just days prior to rescinding the protections for recreational cannabis providers and users.…
The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has issued guidelines on how to limit radiation from cell phone use which may cause cancer. For years we’ve contemplated over cell phones causing cancer, specifically brain cancer. Each year a study debunks this theory, but months later a report surfaces that reignite the debate. And no matter how many studies disprove a cancer link, we worry because we are 24/7 glued to our phones, or the phones are glued to us. Many of us don’t even own a landline anymore as we find it financially obtuse to pay monthly fees for a wall jack we don’t use. We take our phones with us to school, work, the dinner table, and even the toilet. If it wasn’t for the lack of waterproofing, many of us would take our phones with us into the shower. We are geographically closer to our phones than own children. Something’s got to bite us in the butt…… Earlier this year a Superior Court Judge in California ordered the state to release papers discussing the risk of long-term cell phone use. According to sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com, “The documents were written by the state’s Environmental Health Investigations branch and are believed to contain cell phone radiation warnings and recommendations for public use. But the state refused to hand them over when requested by a director at University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health.” Joel Moskowitz, Ph.D in turn sued the state saying this data should be public record and won. He’s…
The Minnesota Wild have already weathered multiple storms in their 2017-18 National Hockey League season, and NHL teams should be afraid -- very afraid -- because the Wild are finally healthy. Wild Weathering Storms Minnesota opened the season playing a schedule that didn’t allow players to get their legs under them. Playing once every four or five days to start the season not only stunted the Wild’s collective rhythm on both sides of the puck, but likely contributed to injuries. Charlie Coyle, Nino Niederreiter and Marcus Foligno all sustained injuries on Oct. 12 in Chicago. Minnesota came into its third game of the season on four days of rest, so it wasn’t as if the Wild were in rhythm or comfortable on their skates or in their schemes. The Blackhawks didn’t seem to be either, as the Wild found a way to get five goals past Corey Crawford for their first win of the year. But Minnesota lost Foligno for a game, Niederreiter for six and Coyle for 16. The Wild went on to win eight of those 16 games and earned a point in another -- weathering the storm. Minnesota managed to survive another storm when its workhorse goaltender, Devan Dubnyk, was shut down for six games with a lower body injury sustained on Dec. 12. But backup netminder Alex Stalock preserved the Wild win over Calgary that day, making 17 saves and allowing just one goal. Stalock played well enough for the Wild to win half of their…
Since his start at GCN in Jan, 2012, Steve Sanchez has been one of GCN’s most popular weekend show hosts. Steve’s schedule has always remained the same - live Sunday evening from 9:00 pm - midnight (Central) with an encore rebroadcast the following Saturday morning from 9:00 am - noon but that’s about to change. The Steve Sanchez Show will continue to broadcast live Sunday night, same time, with an encore rebroadcast every Saturday morning but Steve is adding additional M-F timeslots. Starting on January 8th The Steve Sanchez Show will begin to air one hour live M-F from 8:00 pm -9:00 pm (Central). For those of you not familiar with Steve Sanchez he is, obviously, a radio talk show host but he is also a financial advisor and political commentator. For 25 years, Steve has been engaging the public with a "CONSTITUTION IN ONE HAND AND A BIBLE IN THE OTHER!" His Real, Raw, Relevant talk has the ear of Baby Boomer's, the GEN-Xers and the Millennials. In 2013 Steve was ranked #45 (of 50) in Talkers Magazine’s yearly, “Frontier Fifty List,” which recognizes a selection of outstanding talk media webcasters. When asked to describe the show he says in it's "water-cooler talk on steroids” discussing everyday things we talk about - life, money, politics, values and faith. Steve has also been recognized Nationally in many areas including The 2008 Who's Who in America as a Business/Financial Consultant, for his unique take and expertise in the areas of entrepreneurship…
Whether it's nuclear winter, terrorist hacking of our energy infrastructure, a climate catastrophe, robot war or the zombie apocalypse, there will come a time the internet dies. A terrorist attack on America’s energy infrastructure would be far more damaging than an attack of civilian lives. Losing our energy infrastructure would make just about every tool useless except those running on renewable energy sources or generators, which is why everyone should be hoarding solar panels and solar chargers. A terrorist attack of America’s energy grid would be devastating to the Internet. It’s not as though it can survive on life support. While server “caretakers” would likely prioritize which servers need to stay running, like those upon which the economy and banks rely, the 191.78 million kilowatt hours required to run Internet servers daily would require more than 53,000 commercial generators rated at 150 kilowatts. That’s just not possible. Relying on solar energy for support would also be problematic. The 191.78 million kilowatt hours to run the Internet each day would require two square miles of solar panels dedicated solely to Internet servers. With 27.2 gigawatts of solar panels installed in America as of May 2016, the U.S. would need more than six times that in order to run the internet from solar power. So it’s time we started using a tool that doesn’t require anything more than food and water to run -- a tool that’s kept people alive for centuries: memory. Committing things to memory could save your life in…
Another year, another Midwest record breaking cold front. The National Weather Service issued wind chill advisories, freeze warnings and an approaching “arctic cold front” to a large portion of the country ranging from mid Texas to Canada and from Montana through New England. Of course, if you live in the Midwest, like I do, you’re already familiar with the cold as we’ve all been living with it for more than a week now. Just last week GCN’s guest medical columnist Dr. Daliah Wachs wrote “How to Prevent Hypothermia” anticipating the cold front. Last week temperatures in MN plunged to -37C making my home state colder than Antarctica (-16C) and even colder than parts of Mars. Author Andy Weir knows what we are going through -- he writes in his novel, “The Martian:” “And thanks to decades of reconnaissance by Curiosity, Opportunity, and the rest of NASA’s band of merry Rovers, we know most of what astronauts will need to survive on Mars once they get there: souped-up spacesuits to protect against massive dust storms and sub-freezing temperatures; tons of freeze-dried food; housing pods that can shield against radiation; and a big drill to unlock the frozen water beneath the Mars surface. It’s not easy living, but not too unlike, say, Minnesota.” Thanks, Mr. Weir! We Minnesotans will keep that in mind. =) Anyway. Stay warm. Keep your pets indoors or keep their outdoor activities to the bare minimum, and dream of warmer days. They are not so far away. ----…
Even those who live in desert states such as Nevada and Arizona run the risk of hypothermia this New Year’s Eve. The holidays flew by us way too quickly and left the wind chill in its wake. Unfortunately with all the hustle and bustle this time of year, we tend to forget how dangerous the weather can be. It would make sense to stay indoors, and for the most part we do….except for New Years. All rules go out the door with this party. The most exciting night of the year can sometimes be the coldest night of the year. And the party ends up outside. And do we don a ski mask, goggles, gloves, galoshes, thermal underwear, winter coat and earmuffs? No. That would make the most unsexy New Year’s outfit. Throw some alcohol into the mix and this can be a deadly combination. The CDC estimates that 1300 deaths occur each year due to hypothermia. So what is hypothermia? What is hypothermia? Hypothermia is a dangerous drop in body temperature and can occur in minutes. Human body temperature averages around 98.6 degrees F. But hypothermia starts setting in at 95 degrees F with shivering, increase respiratory and heart rate, and even confusion. We forget that glucose stores get used up quickly so hypoglycemia can ensue as well, making matters worse, especially in someone who is intoxicated. Frostbite can occur as blood flow decreases to the tips of the ears, fingers, nose and toes. As hypothermia progresses, the shivering…
Anytime there’s a scandal, it becomes a “gate,” reminiscent of Watergate, the hotel/condominium complex in Washington, D.C. where the 1972 break-in of Democratic headquarters led to a President’s resignation. My most important memory of the period was spending the night there once, in my uncle’s home, about a week before the dastardly deed was done. Apple has had a few scandals, though whether or not they were serious is debatable. I don’t recall having any problems with the iPhone 4, although it did lose reception if you held it in a way that covered the external antenna system. Still, “Antenngate” brought enough bad publicity to force Apple to give away free iPhone bumper cases for a while; that move overcame the problem. The bending issue with the iPhone 6 Plus evidently was first spotted when the unit was placed in the rear pocket of someone’s tight pair of jeans. Call it “Bendgate,” and while Apple and others, even Consumer Reports magazine, claimed that the product was acceptably resistant against such damage, Apple shored up the structure for the iPhone 6s Plus. Now we have what I call “Throttlegate,” the practice if capping performance on recent iPhones when the battery is determined to have seriously deteriorated. Apple defends the move as preventing a potential shutdown when these units are under heavy load, but maybe they should have been more proactive to explain to customers what was going on. So far, at least three class action lawsuits have been filed, and while…
“Regardless of what branch of government, office or party affiliation, the law applies to each and every one of us!” Yesterday, while I was drudging through the Christmas season of waiting for it all to be over with so I can get back to work, and while on hold, I turned on the conservative radio only to hear the “same old, same old” when it comes to warmongering to prepare the American people for another war. I heard a former adviser to former Vice President Dick Cheney grilling the American people on what they need to do concerning the monster that has been cast into the minds of the American people by the media in North Korea named Kim Jong-Un. His talking points were far too familiar. Kim Jong’s “weapons of mass destruction” were mentioned and how they will be used against us if we do not respond immediately to the threat from the dictator across the water. Ever since I can remember, there has been war after war, administration after administration, decade after decade, and generation after generation. Enough of war, I say. Don’t get me wrong. I will be the first to stand with the righteous if there is a justifiable war (2 Chronicles 19:2-3), though I hate violence. The adviser’s talking points seemed well rehearsed. He seemed skilled in coercing the people into another war (Ecclesiastes 1:9). Furthermore, his talking points sounded like someone pushed the replay button for the war against Iraq (Ecclesiastes 1:9). Then again,…