Tuesday, 12 September 2017 20:29

Tattoo Ink Gets Absorbed and Migrates to Other Tissues

Written by Dr. Daliah Wachs
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A study from Germany and Synchrotron Radiation Facility, published in Scientific Reports, states that nanoparticles from toxic tattoo elements leak into the body.

 

Although previous studies suggested tattoo ink compounds to migrate to lymph nodes, as researchers would find pigmented lymph nodes, this was the first study that identified ink particles in nano form that leaked and deposited in distant tissues.

 

“The lymph nodes become tinted with the color of the tattoo. It is the response of the body to clean the site of entrance of the tattoo. What we didn’t know is that they do it in a nano form, which implies that they may not have the same behavior as the particles at a micro level. And that is the problem: we don’t know how nanoparticles react,” Bernhard Hesse, study author stated.

 

Tattoo ink contains multiple compounds, such as the inorganic compound titanium dioxide, heavy metals such as lead, beryllium, chromium, cobalt, nickel and arsenic, as well as preservatives. Their safety in human tissue has been controversial.

 

 

tattoo-in-skin-cross-section2

 

The lymphatic system is an intricate drainage system that helps clear the body of debris, toxins and unwanted materials.  Lymph nodes hold the white blood cells that fight infections and act as a filter as the debris gets cleared through.  Liver and kidney’s eventually handle the detoxification needed.

 

The consequences of tattoo ink depositing elsewhere has yet to be determined. Can it lead to cancer?  Can it cause inflammation increasing heart risk?

Study author, Hiram Castillo, states, “When someone wants to get a tattoo, they are often very careful in choosing a parlor where they use sterile needles that haven’t been used previously. No one checks the chemical composition of the colors, but our study shows that maybe they should.”

 

Dr. Daliah says, "I'm not overly worried as people have had tattoos for decades, but some full back or body tattoos could be risky."

 

 

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Daliah Wachs is a guest contributor to GCN news.  Doctor Wachs is an MD,  FAAFP and a Board Certified Family Physician.    The Dr. Daliah Show , is nationally syndicated M-F from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm and Saturday from Noon-1:00 pm (all central times) at GCN.